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      QUANTIFYING LIFE CYCLE ENERGY AND CARBON FOOTPRINTS OF CHINA'S RESIDENTIAL SMALL DISTRICT

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          Abstract

          Whereas current building related life cycle energy and carbon assessment in China has typically focused on either the national building stock or the single building level, this paper attempts to evaluate life cycle energy consumption and carbon emissions at the level of Chinese residential small district (RSD). This paper discusses a case study of RSD in order to illustrate the way of measuring material, energy and water flows at this spatial level with transparent assessment boundary. Results indicate that evaluating the RSD as a whole, rather than building by building, can provide extra decision-making information for various stakeholders such as housing buyers and RSD designers.

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          Most cited references 22

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          The importance of carbon footprint estimation boundaries.

          Because of increasing concern about global climate change and carbon emissions as a causal factor, many companies and organizations are pursuing "carbon footprint" projects to estimate their own contributions to global climate change. Protocol definitions from carbon registries help organizations analyze their footprints. The scope of these protocols varies but generally suggests estimating only direct emissions and emissions from purchased energy, with less focus on supply chain emissions. In contrast approaches based on comprehensive environmental life-cycle assessment methods are available to track total emissions across the entire supply chain, and experience suggests that following narrowly defined estimation protocols will generally lead to large underestimates of carbon emissions for providing products and services. Direct emissions from an industry are, on average, only 14% of the total supply chain carbon emissions (often called Tier 1 emissions), and direct emissions plus industry energy inputs are, on average, only 26% of the total supply chain emissions (often called Tier 1 and 2 emissions). Without a full knowledge of their footprints, firms will be unable to pursue the most cost-effective carbon mitigation strategies. We suggest that firms use the screening-level analysis described here to set the bounds of their footprinting strategy to ensure that they do not ignore large sources of environmental effects across their supply chains. Such information can help firms pursue carbon and environmental emission mitigation projects not only within their own plants but also across their supply chain.
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            Analysis of embodied energy use in the residential building of Hong Kong

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              Analysing the life-cycle energy of an Australian residential building and its householders

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Fall 2011
                : 6
                : 4
                : 96-111
                Author notes
                ABOUT THE AUTHORS

                aFaculty of Built Environment, University of New South Wales Australia, dengwu2000@ 123456hotmail.com .

                bUNEP TONGJI Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse Study, Tongji University China.

                Wu Deng has recently obtained a PhD from the Faculty of the Built Environment at the University of New South Wales Australia.

                Professor Deo Prasad is the director of Sustainable Development Program in the Faculty of the Built Environment at the University of New South Wales Australia.

                Dr. Paul Osmond is a course coordinator within the Sustainable Development Program in the Faculty of the Built Environment at the University of New South Wales Australia.

                Professor Feng Ting Li is the deputy dean of the UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development China.

                Article
                jgb.6.4.96
                10.3992/jgb.6.4.96
                ©2011 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-7 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 16
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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