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      Supporting the Aging Workforce: A Review and Recommendations for Workplace Intervention Research

      1 , 2 , 1

      Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior

      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          The workforce in most industrialized countries is aging and becoming more age-diverse, and this trend is expected to continue throughout the twenty-first century. Although there has been an increased interest in research on age differences at work, few studies have examined actual interventions designed to support workers at different points across the life span. In this article, we review the literature related to aging at work, including physical, cognitive, personality, and motivational changes; life-span development theories; age stereotyping; age diversity; and work–life balance. Based on this review, we propose a number of avenues for intervention research to address age differences at work. We conclude by identifying critical challenges specific to studying age at work that should be addressed to advance research on interventions.

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          Most cited references 108

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          Taking time seriously. A theory of socioemotional selectivity.

          Socioemotional selectivity theory claims that the perception of time plays a fundamental role in the selection and pursuit of social goals. According to the theory, social motives fall into 1 of 2 general categories--those related to the acquisition of knowledge and those related to the regulation of emotion. When time is perceived as open-ended, knowledge-related goals are prioritized. In contrast, when time is perceived as limited, emotional goals assume primacy. The inextricable association between time left in life and chronological age ensures age-related differences in social goals. Nonetheless, the authors show that the perception of time is malleable, and social goals change in both younger and older people when time constraints are imposed. The authors argue that time perception is integral to human motivation and suggest potential implications for multiple subdisciplines and research interests in social, developmental, cultural, cognitive, and clinical psychology.
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            The relationship of age to ten dimensions of job performance.

             C. Feldman,  Davis Ng (2008)
            Previous reviews of the literature on the relationship between age and job performance have largely focused on core task performance but have paid much less attention to other job behaviors that also contribute to productivity. The current study provides an expanded meta-analysis on the relationship between age and job performance that includes 10 dimensions of job performance: core task performance, creativity, performance in training programs, organizational citizenship behaviors, safety performance, general counterproductive work behaviors, workplace aggression, on-the-job substance use, tardiness, and absenteeism. Results show that although age was largely unrelated to core task performance, creativity, and performance in training programs, it demonstrated stronger relationships with the other 7 performance dimensions. Results also highlight that the relationships of age with core task performance and with counterproductive work behaviors are curvilinear in nature and that several sample characteristics and data collection characteristics moderate age-performance relationships. The article concludes with a discussion of key research design issues that may further knowledge about the age-performance relationship in the future. Copyright 2008 APA
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              TIME, TEAMS, AND TASK PERFORMANCE: CHANGING EFFECTS OF SURFACE- AND DEEP-LEVEL DIVERSITY ON GROUP FUNCTIONING.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior
                Annu. Rev. Organ. Psychol. Organ. Behav.
                Annual Reviews
                2327-0608
                2327-0616
                April 10 2015
                April 10 2015
                : 2
                : 1
                : 351-381
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychology, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97207; email: ,
                [2 ]Oregon Nurses Foundation, Tualatin, Oregon 97062; email:
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-032414-111435
                © 2015

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