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      Mapping the Health, Safety and Wellbeing Challenges of Firefighting to Wearable Devices

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Smart Firefighting, Biometrics, Human-Data Interaction

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          Abstract

          Firefighting remains a dangerous job and those employed face many challenges to health, safety and wellbeing. The risks faced range from immediate threat to life and limb to long term, repeated exposure to hazardous environments and arduous working conditions. Many of these hazards can be mitigated by recording exposure to risks, processing risk data, improving information flow and increasing situational awareness. Cyber-physical systems and interactive smart wearables offer a smart and seamless suite of tools that can help achieve these goals and allow emergency responders to work more efficiently and safely. Here we examine how data from wearable devices can be used to improve health, safety and wellbeing of the firefighter.

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          Most cited references 18

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          The thermal ergonomics of firefighting reviewed.

          The occupation of firefighting is one that has repeatedly attracted the research interests of ergonomics. Among the activities encountered are attention to live fires, performing search and rescue of victims, and dealing with emergencies. The scientific literature is reviewed to highlight the investigative models used to contribute to the knowledge base about the ergonomics of firefighting, in particular to establish the multi-variate demands of the job and the attributes and capabilities of operators to cope with these demands. The job requires individuals to be competent in aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity, muscle strength, and have an appropriate body composition. It is still difficult to set down thresholds for values in all the areas in concert. Physiological demands are reflected in metabolic, circulatory, and thermoregulatory responses and hydration status, whilst psychological strain can be partially reflected in heart rate and endocrine measures. Research models have comprised of studying live fires, but more commonly in simulations in training facilities or treadmills and other ergometers. Wearing protective clothing adds to the physiological burden, raising oxygen consumption and body temperature, and reducing the time to fatigue. More sophisticated models of cognitive function compatible with decision-making in a fire-fighting context need to be developed. Recovery methods following a fire-fighting event have focused on accelerating the restoration towards homeostasis. The effectiveness of different recovery strategies is considered, ranging from passive cooling and wearing of cooling jackets to immersions in cold water and combinations of methods. Rehydration is also relevant in securing the safety of firefighters prior to returning for the next event in their work shift.
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            Real-time core body temperature estimation from heart rate for first responders wearing different levels of personal protective equipment

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              Cognitive Functioning and Heat Strain: Performance Responses and Protective Strategies

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-5
                Affiliations
                Ulsterw University

                School of Health Science
                Ulster University

                School of Computing
                Ulster University

                School of Psychology
                Ulster University

                Belfast School of Architecture and the Built Environment
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.116
                © Devine et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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