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      A carbapenem-resistant clinical isolate of Aeromonas hydrophila in Japan harbouring an acquired gene encoding GES-24 β-lactamase

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          Abstract

          Several species of Aeromonas produce the enzyme CphA metallo-β-lactamase. This study describes an isolate of Aeromonas hydrophila harbouring an acquired gene encoding the carbapenemase GES-24. This isolate was obtained from an inpatient in Okinawa, Japan, with no apparent record of travelling overseas. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of carbapenems against this isolate were 8 µg ml-1 for imipenem and 16 µg ml-1 for meropenem. Recombinant GES-24 hydrolyzed all of the tested β-lactams, including imipenem and meropenem. The genomic environment surrounding blaGES-24 was intI1-blaGES-24-aac(6')-IIc-qacEdelta1-sulI-orfX-tetR-tetE. This is the first report of A. hydrophila producing a GES-type carbapenemase.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Aeromonas spp. clinical microbiology and disease.

          Members of the genus Aeromonas inhabit various aquatic environments and are responsible for, and are implicated in, a number of intestinal and extra-intestinal infections in humans as well as other animals. This review focuses on invasive human infection and disease and summarizes available findings regarding the microbiology and detection of Aeromonas spp., with emphasis on successful identification and diagnosis, and the control of disease in the population. Antimicrobial resistance and therapy of Aeromonas spp. is also discussed. Copyright © 2010 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance: Two decades on.

            After two decades of the discovery of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), three different mechanisms have been associated to this phenomenon: target protection (Qnr proteins, including several families with multiple alleles), active efflux pumps (mainly QepA and OqxAB pumps) and drug modification [AAC(6')-Ib-cr acetyltransferase]. PMQR genes are usually associated with mobile or transposable elements on plasmids, and, in the case of qnr genes, are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. Although the three PMQR mechanisms alone cause only low-level resistance to quinolones, they can complement other mechanisms of chromosomal resistance to reach clinical resistance level and facilitate the selection of higher-level resistance, raising a threat to the treatment of infections by microorganisms that host these mechanisms.
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              Occurrence of carbapenemase-producing bacteria in coastal recreational waters

              The spread of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative rods is an emerging global problem. Although most infections due to carbapenemase producers are limited to healthcare institutions, reports of the occurrence of clinically relevant carbapenemase producers in sewage and polluted rivers are increasingly frequent. Polluted rivers flowing to oceans may contaminate coastal waters with multidrug-resistant bacteria, potentially threatening the safety of recreational activities in these locations. Here we assessed the occurrence of carbapenemase producers in water from touristic beaches located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, showing distinct pollution patterns. The presence of enterobacteria was noted, including the predominantly environmental genus Kluyvera spp., producing either Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) or Guyana extended-spectrum (GES)-type carbapenemases and often associated with quinolone resistance determinants. An Aeromonas sp. harbouring blaKPC and qnrS was also observed. These findings strengthen the role of aquatic matrices as reservoirs and vectors of clinically relevant antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, with potential to favour the spread of these resistance threats throughout the community.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Medical Microbiology
                Microbiology Society
                0022-2615
                1473-5644
                November 01 2018
                November 01 2018
                : 67
                : 11
                : 1535-1537
                Affiliations
                [1 ] 1​Department of Infectious, Respiratory, and Digestive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan
                [2 ] 2​Division of Clinical Laboratory and Blood Transfusion, University of the Ryukyus Hospital, Okinawa, Japan
                [3 ] 3​Department of Microbiology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
                [4 ] 4​Department of Emergency Medicine, Okinawa Prefectural Nanbu Medical Center and Children’s Medical Center, Okinawa, Japan
                [5 ] 5​Department of Clinical Laboratory, Okinawa Prefectural Nanbu Medical Center and Children’s Medical Center, Okinawa, Japan
                [6 ] 6​Control and Prevention of Infectious Disease, University of the Ryukyus Hospital, Okinawa, Japan
                Article
                10.1099/jmm.0.000842
                30289383
                © 2018

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