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      Carbon monoxide stunning of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) modifies rigor mortis and sensory traits as revealed by NIRS and other instruments.

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          Abstract

          Methods of stunning used in salmon slaughter are still the subject of research. Fish quality can be influenced by pre-, ante- and post-mortem conditions, including handling before slaughter, slaughter methods and storage conditions. Carbon monoxide (CO) is known to improve colour stability in red muscle and to reduce microbial growth and lipid oxidation in live fish exposed to CO. Quality differences in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., stunned by CO or percussion, were evaluated and compared by different techniques [near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS), electronic nose (EN), electronic tongue (ET)] and sensory analysis.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Sci. Food Agric.
          Journal of the science of food and agriculture
          Wiley
          1097-0010
          0022-5142
          Aug 2016
          : 96
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Agri-Food Production and Environmental Sciences, Section of Animal Sciences, University of Firenze, Via delle Cascine 5, 50144, Firenze, Italy.
          [2 ] Department of Animal Medicine, Production and Health, University of Padova, Viale dell'Università 16, 35020, Legnaro, Padova, Italy.
          [3 ] Agriculture Academy of Torino, Via A. Doria 10, 10123, Torino, Italy.
          [4 ] Institute of Food and Agricultural Product Qualification, University of Kaposvár, Hungary.
          [5 ] Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
          [6 ] Institute of Marine Research Matre, 5984, Matredal, Norway.
          Article
          10.1002/jsfa.7537
          26593982

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