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      Integrated omics analysis of specialized metabolism in medicinal plants

      1 , 1 , 2 , 1
      The Plant Journal
      Wiley

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          MS-DIAL: Data Independent MS/MS Deconvolution for Comprehensive Metabolome Analysis

          Data-independent acquisition (DIA) in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provides more comprehensive untargeted acquisition of molecular data. Here we provide an open-source software pipeline, MS-DIAL, to demonstrate how DIA improves simultaneous identification and quantification of small molecules by mass spectral deconvolution. For reversed phase LC-MS/MS, our program with an enriched LipidBlast library identified total 1,023 lipid compounds from nine algal strains to highlight their chemotaxonomic relationships.
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            MassBank: a public repository for sharing mass spectral data for life sciences.

            MassBank is the first public repository of mass spectra of small chemical compounds for life sciences (<3000 Da). The database contains 605 electron-ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS), 137 fast atom bombardment MS and 9276 electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS(n) data of 2337 authentic compounds of metabolites, 11 545 EI-MS and 834 other-MS data of 10,286 volatile natural and synthetic compounds, and 3045 ESI-MS(2) data of 679 synthetic drugs contributed by 16 research groups (January 2010). ESI-MS(2) data were analyzed under nonstandardized, independent experimental conditions. MassBank is a distributed database. Each research group provides data from its own MassBank data servers distributed on the Internet. MassBank users can access either all of the MassBank data or a subset of the data by specifying one or more experimental conditions. In a spectral search to retrieve mass spectra similar to a query mass spectrum, the similarity score is calculated by a weighted cosine correlation in which weighting exponents on peak intensity and the mass-to-charge ratio are optimized to the ESI-MS(2) data. MassBank also provides a merged spectrum for each compound prepared by merging the analyzed ESI-MS(2) data on an identical compound under different collision-induced dissociation conditions. Data merging has significantly improved the precision of the identification of a chemical compound by 21-23% at a similarity score of 0.6. Thus, MassBank is useful for the identification of chemical compounds and the publication of experimental data. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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              Production of the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid in engineered yeast.

              Malaria is a global health problem that threatens 300-500 million people and kills more than one million people annually. Disease control is hampered by the occurrence of multi-drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Synthetic antimalarial drugs and malarial vaccines are currently being developed, but their efficacy against malaria awaits rigorous clinical testing. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide extracted from Artemisia annua L (family Asteraceae; commonly known as sweet wormwood), is highly effective against multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium spp., but is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria sufferers. Although total synthesis of artemisinin is difficult and costly, the semi-synthesis of artemisinin or any derivative from microbially sourced artemisinic acid, its immediate precursor, could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, high-quality and reliable source of artemisinin. Here we report the engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high titres (up to 100 mg l(-1)) of artemisinic acid using an engineered mevalonate pathway, amorphadiene synthase, and a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) from A. annua that performs a three-step oxidation of amorpha-4,11-diene to artemisinic acid. The synthesized artemisinic acid is transported out and retained on the outside of the engineered yeast, meaning that a simple and inexpensive purification process can be used to obtain the desired product. Although the engineered yeast is already capable of producing artemisinic acid at a significantly higher specific productivity than A. annua, yield optimization and industrial scale-up will be required to raise artemisinic acid production to a level high enough to reduce artemisinin combination therapies to significantly below their current prices.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Plant Journal
                Plant J
                Wiley
                09607412
                May 2017
                May 2017
                March 30 2017
                : 90
                : 4
                : 764-787
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Chiba University; 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku Chiba 260-8675 Japan
                [2 ]RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science; 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku Yokohama 230-0045 Japan
                Article
                10.1111/tpj.13485
                28109168
                b53164d6-10bc-4841-826c-97bdb0dd93fc
                © 2017

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions

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