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      The unmet supportive care needs of patients with cancer

      , , , , , , Supportive Care Review Group

      Cancer

      Wiley

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          Most cited references 8

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          Information needs of cancer patients in west Scotland: cross sectional survey of patients' views.

          To assess the needs of patients with cancer for information about their condition. Cross sectional survey of patients' views by means of semistructured interview with questionnaire. A regional cancer centre and two university hospitals in west Scotland. 250 (93%) of 269 cancer patients invited to participate in study who were selected by age, sex, socioeconomic status, and tumour site to be representative of cancer patients in west Scotland. Patients' need to know whether they had cancer, the medical name of their illness, progress through treatment, how treatment works, side effects, chances of cure, and treatment options. 79% (95% confidence interval 73% to 84%) of patients wanted as much information as possible, and 96% (93% to 98%) had a need or an absolute need to know if they had cancer. Most patients also wanted to know the chance of cure (91% (87% to 94%)) and about side effects of treatment (94% (90% to 97%)). When the replies were cross tabulated with patients' age, sex, deprivation score, and type of treatment there was a linear trend for patients from more affluent areas to want more information and those from deprived areas to want less. There was a strong preference for diagnosis of cancer to be given by a hospital doctor (60% (53% to 66%). Almost all patients wanted to know their diagnosis, and most wanted to know about prognosis, treatment options, and side effects.
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            Psychological support for patients undergoing breast cancer surgery: a randomised study.

            To evaluate the effect of support from a nurse specialising in breast care and a voluntary support organisation on prevalence of psychological morbidity after surgery for breast cancer. Prospective randomised study. Three teaching hospitals in Glasgow with established breast clinics. 272 women aged less than 70 years undergoing surgery for breast cancer. Patients were randomly allocated to receive routine care from ward staff, routine care plus support from breast care nurse, routine care plus support from voluntary organisation, or routine care plus support from nurse and organisation. Prevalence of psychological morbidity as assessed by self rating scales: 28 item general health questionnaire and its subscales, and hospital anxiety and depression scale. Measurements were made at first postoperative clinic visit and at three, six, and 12 months after surgery. On each self rating scale, psychological morbidity tended to fall over the 12 month period. For each scale, scores were consistently lower in patients offered support from breast care nurse alone compared with the other groups, which were similar to each other. Differences were significant or nearly so: P values were 0.015 (28 item general health questionnaire), 0.027 (anxiety and insomnia), 0.072 (severe depression), 0.053 (somatic symptoms), 0.031 (social dysfunction), 0.093 (hospital anxiety), and 0.003 (hospital depression). Support from breast care nurse can significantly reduce psychological morbidity, as measured by self rating scales, in women undergoing breast cancer surgery.
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              Response rate to mailed epidemiologic questionnaires: a population-based randomized trial of variations in design and mailing routines.

              Although self-administered questionnaires are major sources of information in epidemiology, comparatively little has been done to study practical aspects of design and mailing. The objective of this study was to evaluate various measures taken to increase the response rate. A questionnaire was mailed in July 1995 to a random sample (n = 2,000) of the Swedish population aged 20-79 years. Using a randomized factorial study design, the questionnaire and mailing procedures were changed in three ways: preliminary notification, length of the questionnaire, and mention of telephone contact. The overall questionnaire retrieval rate was 49%. Preliminary notification (adjusted odds ratio of receiving a completed questionnaire = 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.56 relative to the absence of preliminary notification) and short length of the questionnaire (odds ratio = 1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.48 relative to a long questionnaire) were both independently associated with a higher retrieval rate. Of eight possible combinations, the one comprising preliminary notification, a short questionnaire, and no mention of telephone contact gave the highest retrieval rate, 56%. The lowest retrieval rate, 40%, was observed for the combination of no preliminary notification, a long questionnaire, and mention of telephone contact. Young age, male sex, and urban residence significantly lowered the retrieval rate. Although there was a positive association between the questionnaire retrieval rate and partial nonresponse (missing answers in retrieved questionnaires), the marginal losses due to the latter did not cancel the gains by optimized mailing routines. Old age was the strongest determinant of partial nonresponse. The data provide evidence that design and mailing strategies, as well as demographic characteristics, may greatly influence the response rate of mailed epidemiologic questionnaires.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cancer
                Cancer
                Wiley
                0008-543X
                1097-0142
                January 01 2000
                January 01 2000
                : 88
                : 1
                : 226-237
                10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<226::AID-CNCR30>3.0.CO;2-P
                © 2000

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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