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      A 10-fold decline in the deep Eastern Mediterranean thermohaline overturning circulation during the last interglacial period

      , , , , ,
      Earth and Planetary Science Letters
      Elsevier BV

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          Microbial reduction of uranium

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            Environmental analysis of paleoceanographic systems based on molybdenum–uranium covariation

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              Rapid coupling between ice volume and polar temperature over the past 150,000 years.

              Current global warming necessitates a detailed understanding of the relationships between climate and global ice volume. Highly resolved and continuous sea-level records are essential for quantifying ice-volume changes. However, an unbiased study of the timing of past ice-volume changes, relative to polar climate change, has so far been impossible because available sea-level records either were dated by using orbital tuning or ice-core timescales, or were discontinuous in time. Here we present an independent dating of a continuous, high-resolution sea-level record in millennial-scale detail throughout the past 150,000 years. We find that the timing of ice-volume fluctuations agrees well with that of variations in Antarctic climate and especially Greenland climate. Amplitudes of ice-volume fluctuations more closely match Antarctic (rather than Greenland) climate changes. Polar climate and ice-volume changes, and their rates of change, are found to covary within centennial response times. Finally, rates of sea-level rise reached at least 1.2 m per century during all major episodes of ice-volume reduction.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Earth and Planetary Science Letters
                Earth and Planetary Science Letters
                Elsevier BV
                0012821X
                December 2018
                December 2018
                : 503
                : 58-67
                Article
                10.1016/j.epsl.2018.09.013
                b56023b2-87a8-4c13-86d7-407909a9a93c
                © 2018

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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