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      Kruppel like factor 16 promotes lung adenocarcinoma progression by upregulating lamin B2

      research-article
      a , b , c , d , e , e , e
      Bioengineered
      Taylor & Francis
      Lung cancer, KLF16, LMNB2, cancer biomarker, prognosis

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          ABSTRACT

          Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death. In the past decade, the treatment and diagnosis of lung cancer have progressed significantly in early efforts to promote the survival of lung cancer patients. Kruppel like factor 16 (KLF16) is a zinc finger transcription factor that regulates a diverse array of developmental events and cellular processes. KLF16 is involved in the progression of various cancer types. However, the role of KLF16 in the development of lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, KLF16 was overexpressed in lung cancer samples. KLF16 downregulation inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. Conversely, KLF16 overexpression promoted lung cancer cell growth and invasion. Mechanistically, the expression level LMNB2 was suppressed by KLF16 knockdown and was promoted by KLF16 overexpression. The overall survival of patients with high LMNB2 levels was poor. Luciferase assays showed that KLF16 promoted the transcription activity of LMNB2 gene. Concomitantly, the expression level of LMNB2 was also higher in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) than in normal tissues, and its knockdown or overexpression can reverse the effect of KLF16 overexpression or knockdown on lung cancer cell proliferation, migration, and even tumorigenesis, indicating that LMNB2 also functions as an oncogene. In conclusion, KLF16 can be used as a potential therapeutic and preventive biomarker in lung cancer treatment and prognosis by actively regulating the expression of LMNB2.

          GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

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          Most cited references33

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          Global cancer statistics 2020: GLOBOCAN estimates of incidence and mortality worldwide for 36 cancers in 185 countries

          This article provides an update on the global cancer burden using the GLOBOCAN 2020 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality produced by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Worldwide, an estimated 19.3 million new cancer cases (18.1 million excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer) and almost 10.0 million cancer deaths (9.9 million excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer) occurred in 2020. Female breast cancer has surpassed lung cancer as the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an estimated 2.3 million new cases (11.7%), followed by lung (11.4%), colorectal (10.0 %), prostate (7.3%), and stomach (5.6%) cancers. Lung cancer remained the leading cause of cancer death, with an estimated 1.8 million deaths (18%), followed by colorectal (9.4%), liver (8.3%), stomach (7.7%), and female breast (6.9%) cancers. Overall incidence was from 2-fold to 3-fold higher in transitioned versus transitioning countries for both sexes, whereas mortality varied <2-fold for men and little for women. Death rates for female breast and cervical cancers, however, were considerably higher in transitioning versus transitioned countries (15.0 vs 12.8 per 100,000 and 12.4 vs 5.2 per 100,000, respectively). The global cancer burden is expected to be 28.4 million cases in 2040, a 47% rise from 2020, with a larger increase in transitioning (64% to 95%) versus transitioned (32% to 56%) countries due to demographic changes, although this may be further exacerbated by increasing risk factors associated with globalization and a growing economy. Efforts to build a sustainable infrastructure for the dissemination of cancer prevention measures and provision of cancer care in transitioning countries is critical for global cancer control.
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            Analysis of relative gene expression data using real-time quantitative PCR and the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) Method.

            The two most commonly used methods to analyze data from real-time, quantitative PCR experiments are absolute quantification and relative quantification. Absolute quantification determines the input copy number, usually by relating the PCR signal to a standard curve. Relative quantification relates the PCR signal of the target transcript in a treatment group to that of another sample such as an untreated control. The 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method is a convenient way to analyze the relative changes in gene expression from real-time quantitative PCR experiments. The purpose of this report is to present the derivation, assumptions, and applications of the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method. In addition, we present the derivation and applications of two variations of the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method that may be useful in the analysis of real-time, quantitative PCR data. Copyright 2001 Elsevier Science (USA).
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              Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances.

              Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Bioengineered
                Bioengineered
                Bioengineered
                Taylor & Francis
                2165-5979
                2165-5987
                7 April 2022
                2022
                7 April 2022
                : 13
                : 4
                : 9483-9495
                Affiliations
                [a ]Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University; , Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China
                [b ]Department of Cardiac Surgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University; , Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China
                [c ]Department of Internal Medicine, Yuanshi County Hospital; , Yunshi, Jiangsu, China
                [d ]Department of Infectious Disease, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University; , Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China
                [e ]Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University; , Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China
                Author notes
                CONTACT Hongjiang Yan yhj15130605657@ 123456163.com Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University. No. 215; , Heping West Road, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050000, China
                Article
                2060780
                10.1080/21655979.2022.2060780
                9161888
                35387557
                b57a6a05-99bc-41aa-88c0-86b2f67e9513
                © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                Page count
                Figures: 6, Tables: 1, References: 44, Pages: 13
                Categories
                Research Article
                Research Paper

                Biomedical engineering
                lung cancer,klf16,lmnb2,cancer biomarker,prognosis
                Biomedical engineering
                lung cancer, klf16, lmnb2, cancer biomarker, prognosis

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