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      Relationship of airflow limitation severity with work productivity reduction and sick leave in a Japanese working population

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          Abstract

          Background

          The aim of this study was to reveal the association between airflow limitation (AL) severity and reduction with work productivity as well as use of sick leave among Japanese workers.

          Methods

          This cross-sectional study included 1,378 workers who underwent a lung function test during a health checkup at the Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Health Care Center. AL was defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity of <0.7. Workers completed a questionnaire on productivity loss at work and sick leave. The quality and quantity of productivity loss at work were measured on a ten-point scale indicating how much work was actually performed on the previous workday. Participants were asked how many days in the past 12 months they were unable to work because of health problems. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations between AL severity and the quality and quantity of productivity loss at work as well as use of sick leave.

          Results

          Compared with workers without AL, workers with moderate-to-severe AL showed a significant productivity loss (quality: odds ratio [OR] =2.04, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12–3.71, P=0.02 and quantity: OR =2.19, 95% CI: 1.20–4.00, P=0.011) and use of sick leave (OR =2.69, 95% CI: 1.33–5.44, P=0.006) after adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, smoking status, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, sleep duration, work hours per day, and workplace smoking environment.

          Conclusion

          AL severity was significantly associated with work productivity loss and use of sick leave. Our findings suggested that early intervention in the subjects with AL at the workforce might be beneficial for promoting work ability.

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          Most cited references 22

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          Prevalence and outcomes of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in COPD.

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with important chronic comorbid diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension. The present study analysed data from 20,296 subjects aged > or =45 yrs at baseline in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). The sample was stratified based on baseline lung function data, according to modified Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. Comorbid disease at baseline and death and hospitalisations over a 5-yr follow-up were then searched for. Lung function impairment was found to be associated with more comorbid disease. In logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking, body mass index and education, subjects with GOLD stage 3 or 4 COPD had a higher prevalence of diabetes (odds ratio (OR) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.9), hypertension (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.3-1.9) and cardiovascular disease (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.9-3.0). Comorbid disease was associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation and mortality that was worse in people with impaired lung function. Lung function impairment is associated with a higher risk of comorbid disease, which contributes to a higher risk of adverse outcomes of mortality and hospitalisations.
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            Physical activity in patients with COPD.

            The present study aimed to measure physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to: 1) identify the disease stage at which physical activity becomes limited; 2) investigate the relationship of clinical characteristics with physical activity; 3) evaluate the predictive power of clinical characteristics identifying very inactive patients; and 4) analyse the reliability of physical activity measurements. In total, 163 patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage I-IV; BODE (body mass index, airway obstruction, dyspnoea, exercise capacity) index score 0-10) and 29 patients with chronic bronchitis (normal spirometry; former GOLD stage 0) wore activity monitors that recorded steps per day, minutes of at least moderate activity, and physical activity levels for 5 days (3 weekdays plus Saturday and Sunday). Compared with patients with chronic bronchitis, steps per day, minutes of at least moderate activity and physical activity levels were reduced from GOLD stage II/BODE score 1, GOLD stage III/BODE score 3/4 and from GOLD stage III/BODE score 1, respectively. Reliability of physical activity measurements improved with the number of measured days and with higher GOLD stages. Moderate relationships were observed between clinical characteristics and physical activity. GOLD stages III and IV best predicted very inactive patients. Physical activity is reduced in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease from Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage II/ body mass index, airway obstruction, dyspnoea, exercise capacity score 1. Clinical characteristics of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease only incompletely reflect their physical activity.
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              Physical inactivity in patients with COPD, a controlled multi-center pilot-study.

              Physical activity (PA) has been reported to be reduced in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies in moderate COPD are currently scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate physical activity in daily life in patients with COPD (n=70) and controls (n=30). A multi-center controlled study was conducted. PA was assessed using a multisensor armband device (SenseWear, BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA) and is reported as the average number of steps per day, and the time spent in mild and moderate physical activity. Patients suffered from mild (n=9), moderate (n=28), severe (n=23) and very severe (n=10) COPD. The time spent in activities with mild (80 + or - 69 min vs 160 + or - 89 min, p<0.0001) and moderate intensity (24 + or - 29 min vs 65 + or - 70 min; p<0.0036) was reduced in patients compared to controls. The number of steps reached 87 + or - 34%, 71 + or - 32%, 49 + or - 34% and 29 + or - 20% of control values in GOLD-stages I to IV respectively. The time spent in activities at moderate intensity was 53 + or - 47%, 41 + or - 45%, 31 + or - 47% and 22 + or - 34% of the values obtained in controls respectively with increasing GOLD-stage. These differences reached statistical significance as of GOLD stage II (p<0.05). No differences were observed among centers. Physical activity is reduced early in the disease progression (as of GOLD-stage II). Reductions in physical activities at moderate intensity seem to precede the reduction in the amount of physical activities at lower intensity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2016
                16 March 2016
                : 11
                : 567-575
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
                [2 ]Department of Public Health, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
                [3 ]Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Health Care Center, Kumamoto, Japan
                [4 ]Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Hisamitsu Omori, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 862-0976, Japan, Tel/fax +81 96 373 5462, Email omorih@ 123456gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
                Article
                copd-11-567
                10.2147/COPD.S99786
                4801209
                27042045
                © 2016 Onoue et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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