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      EXPLORING THE RELEVANCE OF GENDER AND AGE DIFFERENCES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF SOCIAL FEARS IN ADOLESCENCE

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      Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
      Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd

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          Abstract

          Although social phobia is one of the most common mental disorders in adolescents, information on the need for normative data is missing. For this reason, this cross-sectional study was aimed at determining if there is a need to have normative data according to age and gender in socially anxious adolescents. Furthermore, we analyzed whether or not boys and girls differ in the nature of their social fears. The study population comprised 2,543 Spanish-speaking adolescents randomly recruited from 10 schools. The results indicate that there is no need for different normative data based on age and gender. Moreover, our data also indicate that even though there are quantitative differences between boys and girls, i.e., girls report a higher percentage, a qualitative analysis revealed that boys and girls experience the same social fears and, therefore, the nature of the social-anxiety provoking situations is the same across gender. Implications for developmental theories and assessment are discussed as well.

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          Most cited references15

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          Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.

          Little is known about lifetime prevalence or age of onset of DSM-IV disorders. To estimate lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the recently completed National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Nationally representative face-to-face household survey conducted between February 2001 and April 2003 using the fully structured World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Nine thousand two hundred eighty-two English-speaking respondents aged 18 years and older. Lifetime DSM-IV anxiety, mood, impulse-control, and substance use disorders. Lifetime prevalence estimates are as follows: anxiety disorders, 28.8%; mood disorders, 20.8%; impulse-control disorders, 24.8%; substance use disorders, 14.6%; any disorder, 46.4%. Median age of onset is much earlier for anxiety (11 years) and impulse-control (11 years) disorders than for substance use (20 years) and mood (30 years) disorders. Half of all lifetime cases start by age 14 years and three fourths by age 24 years. Later onsets are mostly of comorbid conditions, with estimated lifetime risk of any disorder at age 75 years (50.8%) only slightly higher than observed lifetime prevalence (46.4%). Lifetime prevalence estimates are higher in recent cohorts than in earlier cohorts and have fairly stable intercohort differences across the life course that vary in substantively plausible ways among sociodemographic subgroups. About half of Americans will meet the criteria for a DSM-IV disorder sometime in their life, with first onset usually in childhood or adolescence. Interventions aimed at prevention or early treatment need to focus on youth.
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            Adolescent peer relations, friendships, and romantic relationships: do they predict social anxiety and depression?

            This study examined multiple levels of adolescents' interpersonal functioning, including general peer relations (peer crowd affiliations, peer victimization), and qualities of best friendships and romantic relationships as predictors of symptoms of depression and social anxiety. An ethnically diverse sample of 421 adolescents (57% girls; 14 to 19 years) completed measures of peer crowd affiliation, peer victimization, and qualities of best friendships and romantic relationships. Peer crowd affiliations (high and low status), positive qualities in best friendships, and the presence of a dating relationship protected adolescents against feelings of social anxiety, whereas relational victimization and negative interactions in best friendships predicted high social anxiety. In contrast, affiliation with a high-status peer crowd afforded some protection against depressive affect; however, relational victimization and negative qualities of best friendships and romantic relationships predicted depressive symptoms. Some moderating effects for ethnicity were observed. Findings indicate that multiple aspects of adolescents' social relations uniquely contribute to feelings of internal distress. Implications for research and preventive interventions are discussed.
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              • Record: found
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              An empirically derived inventory to measure social fears and anxiety: The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
                soc behav pers
                Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd
                0301-2212
                January 01 2008
                January 01 2008
                : 36
                : 3
                : 385-390
                Article
                10.2224/sbp.2008.36.3.385
                b5fe1b46-e0a3-4197-8e6f-f086e1e82b20
                © 2008
                History

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