Blog
About

35
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      No evidence for Fabaceae Gametophytic self-incompatibility being determined by Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae S- RNase lineage genes

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Fabaceae species are important in agronomy and livestock nourishment. They have a long breeding history, and most cultivars have lost self-incompatibility (SI), a genetic barrier to self-fertilization. Nevertheless, to improve legume crop breeding, crosses with wild SI relatives of the cultivated varieties are often performed. Therefore, it is fundamental to characterize Fabaceae SI system(s). We address the hypothesis of Fabaceae gametophytic (G)SI being RNase based, by recruiting the same S-RNase lineage gene of Rosaceae, Solanaceae or Plantaginaceae SI species.

          Results

          We first identify SSK1 like genes (described only in species having RNase based GSI), in the Trifolium pratense, Medicago truncatula, Cicer arietinum, Glycine max, and Lupinus angustifolius genomes. Then, we characterize the S-lineage T2-RNase genes in these genomes. In T. pratense, M. truncatula, and C. arietinum we identify S-RNase lineage genes that in phylogenetic analyses cluster with Pyrinae S-RNases. In M. truncatula and C. arietinum genomes, where large scaffolds are available, these sequences are surrounded by F-box genes that in phylogenetic analyses also cluster with S-pollen genes. In T. pratense the S-RNase lineage genes show, however, expression in tissues not involved in GSI. Moreover, levels of diversity are lower than those observed for other S- RNase genes. The M. truncatula and C. arietinum S-RNase and S-pollen like genes phylogenetically related to Pyrinae S-genes, are also expressed in tissues other than those involved in GSI. To address if other T2-RNases could be determining Fabaceae GSI, here we obtained a style with stigma transcriptome of Cytisus striatus, a species that shows significant difference on the percentage of pollen growth in self and cross-pollinations. Expression and polymorphism analyses of the C. striatus S-RNase like genes revealed that none of these genes, is the S-pistil gene.

          Conclusion

          We find no evidence for Fabaceae GSI being determined by Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae S-RNase lineage genes. There is no evidence that T2-RNase lineage genes could be determining GSI in C. striatus. Therefore, to characterize the Fabaceae S-pistil gene(s), expression analyses, levels of diversity, and segregation analyses in controlled crosses are needed for those genes showing high expression levels in the tissues where GSI occurs.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12870-015-0497-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 118

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          MRBAYES: Bayesian inference of phylogenetic trees.

          The program MRBAYES performs Bayesian inference of phylogeny using a variant of Markov chain Monte Carlo. MRBAYES, including the source code, documentation, sample data files, and an executable, is available at http://brahms.biology.rochester.edu/software.html.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Galaxy: a comprehensive approach for supporting accessible, reproducible, and transparent computational research in the life sciences

            Increased reliance on computational approaches in the life sciences has revealed grave concerns about how accessible and reproducible computation-reliant results truly are. Galaxy http://usegalaxy.org, an open web-based platform for genomic research, addresses these problems. Galaxy automatically tracks and manages data provenance and provides support for capturing the context and intent of computational methods. Galaxy Pages are interactive, web-based documents that provide users with a medium to communicate a complete computational analysis.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              DnaSP, DNA polymorphism analyses by the coalescent and other methods.

              DnaSP is a software package for the analysis of DNA polymorphism data. Present version introduces several new modules and features which, among other options allow: (1) handling big data sets (approximately 5 Mb per sequence); (2) conducting a large number of coalescent-based tests by Monte Carlo computer simulations; (3) extensive analyses of the genetic differentiation and gene flow among populations; (4) analysing the evolutionary pattern of preferred and unpreferred codons; (5) generating graphical outputs for an easy visualization of results. The software package, including complete documentation and examples, is freely available to academic users from: http://www.ub.es/dnasp
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Bruno.aguiar@ibmc.up.pt
                jbvieira@ibmc.up.pt
                Ana.Correia@ibmc.up.pt
                cgvieira@ibmc.up.pt
                Journal
                BMC Plant Biol
                BMC Plant Biol
                BMC Plant Biology
                BioMed Central (London )
                1471-2229
                2 June 2015
                2 June 2015
                2015
                : 15
                Affiliations
                [ ]Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Rua Júlio Amaral de Carvalho 245, Porto, Portugal
                [ ]Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular (IBMC), Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, Porto, 4150-180 Portugal
                Article
                497
                10.1186/s12870-015-0497-2
                4451870
                © Aguiar et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2015

                Comments

                Comment on this article