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      Stem cells in human neurodegenerative disorders--time for clinical translation?

      The Journal of clinical investigation

      Alzheimer Disease, therapy, Stroke, Stem Cell Transplantation, Spinal Cord Injuries, Parkinson Disease, cytology, Neurons, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Humans, physiology, Dopamine, Animals, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

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          Abstract

          Stem cell-based approaches have received much hype as potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, trophic actions, and modulation of inflammation. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce neurons and glial cells in response to injury and could be affected by the degenerative process. As we discuss here, however, significant hurdles remain before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation and learn how to control stem cell proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation in the pathological environment.

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          Journal
          20051634
          10.1172/JCI40543
          2798697

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