3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Biologically Enabled Syntheses of Freestanding Metallic Structures Possessing Subwavelength Pore Arrays for Extraordinary (Surface Plasmon-Mediated) Infrared Transmission

      , , , , , ,

      Advanced Functional Materials

      Wiley-Blackwell

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 55

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Photonic structures in biology.

          Millions of years before we began to manipulate the flow of light using synthetic structures, biological systems were using nanometre-scale architectures to produce striking optical effects. An astonishing variety of natural photonic structures exists: a species of Brittlestar uses photonic elements composed of calcite to collect light, Morpho butterflies use multiple layers of cuticle and air to produce their striking blue colour and some insects use arrays of elements, known as nipple arrays, to reduce reflectivity in their compound eyes. Natural photonic structures are providing inspiration for technological applications.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Light in tiny holes.

            The presence of tiny holes in an opaque metal film, with sizes smaller than the wavelength of incident light, leads to a wide variety of unexpected optical properties such as strongly enhanced transmission of light through the holes and wavelength filtering. These intriguing effects are now known to be due to the interaction of the light with electronic resonances in the surface of the metal film, and they can be controlled by adjusting the size and geometry of the holes. This knowledge is opening up exciting new opportunities in applications ranging from subwavelength optics and optoelectronics to chemical sensing and biophysics.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Beaming light from a subwavelength aperture.

              Light usually diffracts in all directions when it emerges from a subwavelength aperture, which puts a lower limit on the size of features that can be used in photonics. This limitation can be overcome by creating a periodic texture on the exit side of a single aperture in a metal film. The transmitted light emerges from the aperture as a beam with a small angular divergence (approximately +/-3 degrees ) whose directionality can be controlled. This finding is especially surprising, considering that the radiating region is mainly confined to an area with lateral dimensions comparable to the wavelength of the light. The device occupies no more than one cubic micrometer and, when combined with enhanced transmission, suggests that a wide range of photonic applications is possible.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advanced Functional Materials
                Adv. Funct. Mater.
                Wiley-Blackwell
                1616301X
                June 20 2012
                June 20 2012
                : 22
                : 12
                : 2550-2559
                Article
                10.1002/adfm.201102715
                © 2012
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article