2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Silk Fibroin-Based Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering Applications

      ,
      Molecules
      MDPI AG

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Tissue engineering (TE) involves the combination of cells with scaffolding materials and appropriate growth factors in order to regenerate or replace damaged and degenerated tissues and organs. The scaffold materials serve as templates for tissue formation and play a vital role in TE. Among scaffold materials, silk fibroin (SF), a naturally occurring protein, has attracted great attention in TE applications due to its excellent mechanical properties, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and bio-absorbability. SF is usually dissolved in an aqueous solution and can be easily reconstituted into different forms, including films, mats, hydrogels, and sponges, through various fabrication techniques, including spin coating, electrospinning, freeze drying, and supercritical CO2-assisted drying. Furthermore, to facilitate the fabrication of more complex SF-based scaffolds, high-precision techniques such as micro-patterning and bio-printing have been explored in recent years. These processes contribute to the diversity of surface area, mean pore size, porosity, and mechanical properties of different silk fibroin scaffolds and can be used in various TE applications to provide appropriate morphological and mechanical properties. This review introduces the physicochemical and mechanical properties of SF and looks into a range of SF-based scaffolds that have recently been developed. The typical applications of SF-based scaffolds for TE of bone, cartilage, teeth and mandible tissue, cartilage, skeletal muscle, and vascular tissue are highlighted and discussed followed by a discussion of issues to be addressed in future studies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references129

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Alginate: properties and biomedical applications.

          Alginate is a biomaterial that has found numerous applications in biomedical science and engineering due to its favorable properties, including biocompatibility and ease of gelation. Alginate hydrogels have been particularly attractive in wound healing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering applications to date, as these gels retain structural similarity to the extracellular matrices in tissues and can be manipulated to play several critical roles. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of general properties of alginate and its hydrogels, their biomedical applications, and suggest new perspectives for future studies with these polymers.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

            Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Hydrogel: Preparation, characterization, and applications: A review

              Graphical abstract
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                MOLEFW
                Molecules
                Molecules
                MDPI AG
                1420-3049
                May 2022
                April 25 2022
                : 27
                : 9
                : 2757
                Article
                10.3390/molecules27092757
                35566110
                b6f50553-5cf2-4546-916a-d9e2be7630ee
                © 2022

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article