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      Coastal prehistory and submerged landscapes: Molluscan resources, shell-middens and underwater investigations

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      Quaternary International

      Elsevier BV

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          The rising tide: assessing the risks of climate change and human settlements in low elevation coastal zones

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            Sea level and global ice volumes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene.

            The major cause of sea-level change during ice ages is the exchange of water between ice and ocean and the planet's dynamic response to the changing surface load. Inversion of ∼1,000 observations for the past 35,000 y from localities far from former ice margins has provided new constraints on the fluctuation of ice volume in this interval. Key results are: (i) a rapid final fall in global sea level of ∼40 m in <2,000 y at the onset of the glacial maximum ∼30,000 y before present (30 ka BP); (ii) a slow fall to -134 m from 29 to 21 ka BP with a maximum grounded ice volume of ∼52 × 10(6) km(3) greater than today; (iii) after an initial short duration rapid rise and a short interval of near-constant sea level, the main phase of deglaciation occurred from ∼16.5 ka BP to ∼8.2 ka BP at an average rate of rise of 12 m⋅ka(-1) punctuated by periods of greater, particularly at 14.5-14.0 ka BP at ≥40 mm⋅y(-1) (MWP-1A), and lesser, from 12.5 to 11.5 ka BP (Younger Dryas), rates; (iv) no evidence for a global MWP-1B event at ∼11.3 ka BP; and (v) a progressive decrease in the rate of rise from 8.2 ka to ∼2.5 ka BP, after which ocean volumes remained nearly constant until the renewed sea-level rise at 100-150 y ago, with no evidence of oscillations exceeding ∼15-20 cm in time intervals ≥200 y from 6 to 0.15 ka BP.
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              Early human occupation of a maritime desert, Barrow Island, North-West Australia

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Quaternary International
                Quaternary International
                Elsevier BV
                10406182
                May 2021
                May 2021
                : 584
                : 1-8
                Article
                10.1016/j.quaint.2021.03.020
                b7a988ff-b3ca-4308-99c3-35db669c4bd0
                © 2021

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