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      Digital technology adoption scale in the blended learning context in higher education: Development, validation and testing of a specific tool

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          Abstract

          The main aim of the present study was to develop, validate and test an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that contributes to the overall understanding of students' intention to use digital tools in a blended learning context of higher education. The external bidimensional factor of familiarity with digital tools, which is not usually explained by the TAM, was included, and evaluated. Following a four-stage scale development technique, a seven-dimensional 25-item survey was developed, which includes two external correlated variables: familiarity with high-tech digital tools and familiarity with traditional digital tools, two mediator variables—computer anxiety, and perceived barriers, and three response variables, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and intention to use. The initial version of the survey was administered on 250 undergraduate students. Next, for another sample of 206 students, latent dimensions of the survey were tested using exploratory factor analysis. The structure of the survey was validated in two other subsequent stages with one sample of 262 responses of undergraduates and one of 310 responses of master's students from two different universities. All students who agreed to participate in research attended blended learning. The validity, reliability and invariance of the instrument were established by psychometric analyses. Collected data indicated that the survey has an adequate multifactorial structure that is reliable and invariant across degree levels. The scale is recommended for use in higher education studies targeting the promotion of blended learning and reduction of negative attitudes of learners toward digital instruments, supporting university professors to select their own efficient way to teach.

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          Older Adults Perceptions of Technology and Barriers to Interacting with Tablet Computers: A Focus Group Study

          Background New technologies provide opportunities for the delivery of broad, flexible interventions with older adults. Focus groups were conducted to: (1) understand older adults’ familiarity with, and barriers to, interacting with new technologies and tablets; and (2) utilize user-engagement in refining an intervention protocol. Methods Eighteen older adults (65–76 years old; 83.3% female) who were novice tablet users participated in discussions about their perceptions of and barriers to interacting with tablets. We conducted three separate focus groups and used a generic qualitative design applying thematic analysis to analyse the data. The focus groups explored attitudes toward tablets and technology in general. We also explored the perceived advantages and disadvantages of using tablets, familiarity with, and barriers to interacting with tablets. In two of the focus groups, participants had previous computing experience (e.g., desktop), while in the other, participants had no previous computing experience. None of the participants had any previous experience with tablet computers. Results The themes that emerged were related to barriers (i.e., lack of instructions and guidance, lack of knowledge and confidence, health-related barriers, cost); disadvantages and concerns (i.e., too much and too complex technology, feelings of inadequacy, and comparison with younger generations, lack of social interaction and communication, negative features of tablets); advantages (i.e., positive features of tablets, accessing information, willingness to adopt technology); and skepticism about using tablets and technology in general. After brief exposure to tablets, participants emphasized the likelihood of using a tablet in the future. Conclusions Our findings suggest that most of our participants were eager to adopt new technology and willing to learn using a tablet. However, they voiced apprehension about lack of, or lack of clarity in, instructions and support. Understanding older adults’ perceptions of technology is important to assist with introducing it to this population and maximize the potential of technology to facilitate independent living.
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            Personal Learning Environments, social media, and self-regulated learning: A natural formula for connecting formal and informal learning

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              Continuance intention to use MOOCs: Integrating the technology acceptance model (TAM) and task technology fit (TTF) model

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                10 July 2020
                2020
                : 15
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Teacher Training, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania
                [2 ] Psychology Department, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania
                Univerza v Mariboru, SLOVENIA
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-19-26604
                10.1371/journal.pone.0235957
                7351189
                32649691
                b7f5a8ef-ea78-472f-b3d6-0b9297f39114
                © 2020 Lazar et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 4, Pages: 27
                Product
                Funding
                The authors received no specific funding for this work.
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