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      Zabofloxacin versus moxifloxacin in patients with COPD exacerbation: a multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, controlled, Phase III, non-inferiority trial

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          Abstract

          A new quinolone, zabofloxacin, has now been developed; hence, a non-inferiority trial is needed to compare this new compound with another widely used quinolone to examine its efficacy and safety for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. This was a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, controlled, parallel-group, Phase III, non-inferiority clinical trial designed to compare oral zabofloxacin (367 mg once daily for 5 days) with moxifloxacin (400 mg once daily for 7 days) for the treatment of patients with COPD exacerbation. In all, 345 COPD patients with a moderate COPD exacerbation were enrolled in the study via the outpatient clinics at 31 university hospitals. Clinical per protocol analysis revealed that the clinical cure rate for zabofloxacin was 86.7% and that for moxifloxacin was 86.3% (the rate difference, 0.4%; 95% confidence interval, −7.7%–8.6%). Intention-to-treat analysis revealed clinical cure rates of 77.1% and 77.3% (difference, −0.2%; 95% confidence interval, −9.0%–8.8%), respectively. These results confirm that zabofloxacin is not inferior to moxifloxacin. The favorable microbiological response rate for zabofloxacin was 67.4% and that for moxifloxacin was 79.5% ( P=0.22). Patients in the zabofloxacin group showed better patient-oriented outcomes, as measured by EXAcerbations of Chronic Pulmonary Disease Tool-Patient-Reported Outcome and the COPD assessment test scores, than patients in the moxifloxacin group. Adverse drug reactions related to zabofloxacin occurred in 9.7% of cases and those related to moxifloxacin occurred in 9.6% of cases ( P=0.97). The dropout rate due to adverse events was 0% (0/175) in the zabofloxacin group and 1.8% (3/167) in the moxifloxacin group ( P=0.12). Oral zabofloxacin (367 mg once daily for 5 days) was not inferior to oral moxifloxacin (400 mg once daily for 7 days) for the treatment of patients with COPD exacerbation.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Five day moxifloxacin therapy compared with 7 day clarithromycin therapy for the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

          In this multinational, randomized, double-blind study, the efficacy and safety of a 5 day course of moxifloxacin 400 mg orally od was compared with that of a 7 day course of clarithromycin 500 mg orally bd. in 750 patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, characterized by at least two of the symptoms: sputum purulence, increased sputum volume or increased dyspnoea. Seven days after the end of therapy, clinical cure was achieved for 89% (287 of 322) of efficacy-evaluable patients in the moxifloxacin group and 88% (289 of 327) of patients in the clarithromycin group (95% CI, -3.9%, 5.8%). At follow-up (21-28 days post-treatment), the continued clinical cure rates were 89% (256 of 287) for moxifloxacin and 89% (257 of 289) for clarithromycin. A total of 342 pathogenic bacteria were isolated from the sputum of 287 patients. The most common pathogens were Haemophilus influenzae (37%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (31%) and Moraxella catarrhalis (18%). Seven days post-treatment, a successful bacteriological response was obtained for 77% (89 of 115) of patients in the moxifloxacin group and 62% (71 of 114) of patients in the clarithromycin group, indicating superiority of moxifloxacin (95% CI, 3.6%, 26.9%). Both treatments were well tolerated with few adverse events. This study demonstrated that for the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis a 5 day course of moxifloxacin 400 mg od was clinically equivalent and bacteriologically superior to a 7 day course of clarithromycin 500 mg bd.
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            Airways microbial flora in COPD patients in stable clinical conditions and during exacerbations: a bronchoscopic investigation.

            Patients affected with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergo frequent exacerbations of their illness characterized by increased cough and expectoration. The precise aetiology of these episodes often remains unknown. In the absence of clinical or radiographic signs of pneumonia, bacterial or viral cultures of sputum usually provide little useful information. Thus, we performed fibreoptic bronchoscopy using a protected specimen brush (PSB) to obtain uncontaminated secretions for culture from 56 patients with COPD, 16 with stable clinical conditions and 40 affected with exacerbations of the disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate bronchial microbial flora by quantitative aerobic and anaerobic culture of each specimen. Twenty five subjects (45%), 4 (16%) in stable state and 21 (84%) with COPD exacerbations, had specimens which gave rise to significant bacterial growth (> 10(3) colony forming units.mL-1). The predominant bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 10 cases) and alpha-haemolytic streptococci (in 6 cases); other bacteria found were coagulase-negative staphylococci and Branhamella catarralis in (2 cases each), and Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aerococcus viridans and Chromobacterium violaceum (each in a single case only). Although significant bacterial growth was more frequently found in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations and in those with a higher degree of bronchial inflammation, the differences between the two groups of patients were not statistically significant. Nevertheless, the results obtained in our study confirm the validity of and the need for reliable sampling methods (like the protected specimen brush) to demonstrate significant bacterial colonization of the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.
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              • Article: not found

              In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of DW-224a, a new fluoronaphthyridone.

              DW-224a showed the most potent in vitro activity among the quinolone compounds tested against clinical isolates of gram-positive bacteria. Against gram-negative bacteria, DW-224a was slightly less active than the other fluoroquinolones. The in vivo activities of DW-224a against gram-positive bacteria were more potent than those of other quinolones.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2015
                22 October 2015
                : 10
                : 2265-2275
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Korea
                [2 ]Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea
                [3 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Daejeon Hankook Hospital, Daejeon, Korea
                [4 ]Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea
                [5 ]Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Korea
                [6 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Korea
                [7 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center of CHA University, Seongnam, Korea
                [8 ]Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, KyungHee University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
                [9 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                [10 ]Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Yeon Mok Oh, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736, Korea, Tel +82 2 3010 3136, Fax +82 2 3010 6968, Email ymoh55@ 123456amc.seoul.kr
                Article
                copd-10-2265
                10.2147/COPD.S90948
                4622522
                © 2015 Rhee et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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