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      A quick, easy and non‐invasive method to quantify coral growth rates using photogrammetry and 3D model comparisons

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      Methods in Ecology and Evolution

      Wiley

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          Dynamic fragility of oceanic coral reef ecosystems.

          As one of the most diverse and productive ecosystems known, and one of the first ecosystems to exhibit major climate-warming impacts (coral bleaching), coral reefs have drawn much scientific attention to what may prove to be their Achilles heel, the thermal sensitivity of reef-building corals. Here we show that climate change-driven loss of live coral, and ultimately structural complexity, in the Seychelles results in local extinctions, substantial reductions in species richness, reduced taxonomic distinctness, and a loss of species within key functional groups of reef fish. The importance of deteriorating physical structure to these patterns demonstrates the longer-term impacts of bleaching on reefs and raises questions over the potential for recovery. We suggest that isolated reef systems may be more susceptible to climate change, despite escaping many of the stressors impacting continental reefs.
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            Evaluating life-history strategies of reef corals from species traits.

            Classifying the biological traits of organisms can test conceptual frameworks of life-history strategies and allow for predictions of how different species may respond to environmental disturbances. We apply a trait-based classification approach to a complex and threatened group of species, scleractinian corals. Using hierarchical clustering and random forests analyses, we identify up to four life-history strategies that appear globally consistent across 143 species of reef corals: competitive, weedy, stress-tolerant and generalist taxa, which are primarily separated by colony morphology, growth rate and reproductive mode. Documented shifts towards stress-tolerant, generalist and weedy species in coral reef communities are consistent with the expected responses of these life-history strategies. Our quantitative trait-based approach to classifying life-history strategies is objective, applicable to any taxa and a powerful tool that can be used to evaluate theories of community ecology and predict the impact of environmental and anthropogenic stressors on species assemblages. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.
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              Coral chronometers: seasonal growth bands in reef corals.

              Autoradiagraphs and x-radiographs have been made of vertical sections through the centers of reef corals from Eniwetok. Radioactivity bands in the coral structure are caused by strontium-90 and are related to specific series of nuclear tests, thus making possible calculation of long-term growth rates. These data indicate that the cyclic variations in radial density revealed by x-radiography are annual.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Methods in Ecology and Evolution
                Methods Ecol Evol
                Wiley
                2041-210X
                2041-210X
                June 2020
                April 22 2020
                June 2020
                : 11
                : 6
                : 714-726
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Geography College of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Exeter Exeter UK
                Article
                10.1111/2041-210X.13388
                © 2020

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