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      COPD stands for complex obstructive pulmonary disease

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          Abstract

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has extensively been reported as a complex disease affecting patients' health beyond the lungs with a variety of intra- and extrapulmonary components and considerable variability between individuals. This review discusses the assessment of this complexity and underlines the importance of transdisciplinary management programmes addressing the physical, emotional and social health of the individual patient.

          COPD management is challenging and requires advanced, sophisticated strategies meeting the patient's individual needs. Due to the heterogeneity and complexity of the disease leading to non-linear and consequently poorly predictable treatment responses, multidimensional patient profiling is crucial to identify the right COPD patient for the right treatment. Current methods are often restricted to general, well-known and commonly used assessments neglecting potentially relevant (interactions between) individual, unique “traits” to finally ensure personalised treatment. Dynamic, personalised and holistic approaches are needed to tackle this multifaceted disease and to ensure personalised medicine and value-based healthcare.

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          Most cited references 65

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          Health status measurement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

           G Jones (2001)
          Health status measurement is a common feature of studies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This review assesses recent evidence for the validity of these measurements and their role as measures of the overall impact of the disease on the patient's daily life and wellbeing. It reviews the mostly widely used COPD specific questionnaires and examines the contribution that they make to an assessment of the overall effect of treatment. Finally, it addresses the question of how symptomatic benefit may be assessed in individual patients in routine practice.
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            Current concepts in targeting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pharmacotherapy: making progress towards personalised management.

            Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex, and heterogeneous disorder that is responsible for substantial and growing morbidity, mortality, and health-care expense worldwide. Of imperative importance to decipher the complexity of COPD is to identify groups of patients with similar clinical characteristics, prognosis, or therapeutic needs, the so-called clinical phenotypes. This strategy is logical for research but might be of little clinical value because clinical phenotypes can overlap in the same patient and the same clinical phenotype could result from different biological mechanisms. With the goal to match assessment with treatment choices, the latest iteration of guidelines from the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease reorganised treatment objectives into two categories: to improve symptoms (ie, dyspnoea and health status) and to decrease future risk (as predicted by forced expiratory volume in 1 s level and exacerbations history). This change thus moves treatment closer to individualised medicine with available bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs. Yet, future treatment options are likely to include targeting endotypes that represent subtypes of patients defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism. Specific biomarkers of these endotypes would be particularly useful in clinical practice, especially in patients in which clinical phenotype alone is insufficient to identify the underlying endotype. A few series of potential COPD endotypes and biomarkers have been suggested. Empirical knowledge will be gained from proof-of-concept trials in COPD with emerging drugs that target specific inflammatory pathways. In every instance, specific endotype and biomarker efforts will probably be needed for the success of these trials, because the pathways are likely to be operative in only a subset of patients. Network analysis of human diseases offers the possibility to improve understanding of disease pathobiological complexity and to help with the development of new treatment alternatives and, importantly, a reclassification of complex diseases. All these developments should pave the way towards personalised treatment of patients with COPD in the clinic.
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              Is Open Access

              Towards a ‘patient-centred’ operationalisation of the new dynamic concept of health: a mixed methods study

              Objective To evaluate among stakeholders the support for the new, dynamic concept of health, as published in 2011: ‘Health as the ability to adapt and to self-manage’, and to elaborate perceived indicators of health in order to make the concept measurable. Design A mixed methods study: a qualitative first step with interviews and focus groups, followed by a quantitative survey. Participants Representatives of seven healthcare stakeholder domains, for example, healthcare providers, patients with a chronic condition and policymakers. The qualitative study involved 140 stakeholders; the survey 1938 participants. Results The new concept was appreciated, as it addresses people as more than their illness and focuses on strengths rather than weaknesses. Caution is needed as the concept requires substantial personal input of which not everyone is capable. The qualitative study identified 556 health indicators, categorised into six dimensions: bodily functions, mental functions and perception, spiritual/existential dimension, quality of life, social and societal participation, and daily functioning, with 32 underlying aspects. The quantitative study showed all stakeholder groups considering bodily functions to represent health, whereas for other dimensions there were significant differences between groups. Patients considered all six dimensions almost equally important, thus preferring a broad concept of health, whereas physicians assessed health more narrowly and biomedically. In the qualitative study, 78% of respondents considered their health indicators to represent the concept. Conclusions To prevent confusion with health as ‘absence of disease’, we propose the use of the term ‘positive health’ for the broad perception of health with six dimensions, as preferred by patients. This broad perception deserves attention by healthcare providers as it may support shared decision-making in medical practice. For policymakers, the broad perception of ‘positive health’ is valuable as it bridges the gap between healthcare and the social domain, and by that it may demedicalise societal problems.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Respiratory Review
                Eur Respir Rev
                European Respiratory Society (ERS)
                0905-9180
                1600-0617
                June 27 2018
                June 30 2018
                June 06 2018
                June 30 2018
                : 27
                : 148
                : 180027
                Article
                10.1183/16000617.0027-2018
                © 2018

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