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      Latitudinal Migrations of the Subtropical Front at the Agulhas Plateau Through the Mid‐Pleistocene Transition

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          A Pliocene-Pleistocene stack of 57 globally distributed benthic δ18O records

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            On the meridional extent and fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

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              High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present.

              Changes in past atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can be determined by measuring the composition of air trapped in ice cores from Antarctica. So far, the Antarctic Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores have provided a composite record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the past 650,000 years. Here we present results of the lowest 200 m of the Dome C ice core, extending the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by two complete glacial cycles to 800,000 yr before present. From previously published data and the present work, we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide is strongly correlated with Antarctic temperature throughout eight glacial cycles but with significantly lower concentrations between 650,000 and 750,000 yr before present. Carbon dioxide levels are below 180 parts per million by volume (p.p.m.v.) for a period of 3,000 yr during Marine Isotope Stage 16, possibly reflecting more pronounced oceanic carbon storage. We report the lowest carbon dioxide concentration measured in an ice core, which extends the pre-industrial range of carbon dioxide concentrations during the late Quaternary by about 10 p.p.m.v. to 172-300 p.p.m.v.
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                Journal
                Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology
                Paleoceanogr Paleoclimatol
                American Geophysical Union (AGU)
                2572-4517
                2572-4525
                July 2021
                July 12 2021
                July 2021
                : 36
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences University of Notre Dame Notre Dame IN USA
                [2 ]Graduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode Island Narragansett RI USA
                [3 ]Department of Geosciences University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst MA USA
                [4 ]School of Earth Sciences Cardiff University Cardiff UK
                [5 ]Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Lamont‐Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades NY USA
                [6 ]International Ocean Discovery Program Texas A&M University College Station TX USA
                Article
                10.1029/2020PA004084
                b88a9638-9a93-4794-8095-f6f4b7bb42cf
                © 2021

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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