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      Serum magnesium level and arterial calcification in end-stage renal disease.

      Kidney International

      Adult, Aged, Angiography, Arteries, Bone Resorption, complications, Calcinosis, blood, radiography, Calcium, Female, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Longitudinal Studies, Magnesium, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Phosphorus, Vascular Diseases

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          Abstract

          In this paper we examine the relationship of serum levels of Ca, P, Ca X P, P/Mg, Ca X P/Mg, alkaline phosphatase, and iPTH to the development or regression of peripheral arterial calcifications (AC) in 44 patients with end-stage renal disease being treated by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The average follow-up time of this longitudinal study was 27 months (range 6-67 months). The patients were divided into two groups: Group A, those showing one or more increases of AC; and Group B, patients in whom AC either did not develop or decreased during the follow-up. There was no significant difference in serum Ca, P, Ca X P, alkaline phosphatase of iPTH between the two groups. However, serum Mg was significantly lower in Group A than in Group B (2.69 +/- 0.52 and 3.02 +/- 0.51 mg/dl, respectively, P less than 0.001), while the ratios P/Mg and Ca X P/Mg were significantly higher. Our observations suggest that in end-stage renal disease hypermagnesemia may retard the development of arterial calcifications.

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          Most cited references 21

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          Arterial calcification and pathology in uremic patients undergoing dialysis.

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            Magnesium deficiency and hypertension: correlation between magnesium-deficient diets and microcirculatory changes in situ.

            Rats maintained for 12 weeks on diets moderately or more severely deficient in magnesium showed significant elevations in arterial blood pressure compared to control animals. Examination of the mesenteric microcirculation in situ revealed that dietary magnesium deficiency resulted in reduced capillary, postcapillary, and venular blood flow concomitant with reduced terminal arteriolar, precapillary sphincter, and venular lumen sizes. The greater the degree of dietary magnesium deficiency the greater the reductions in microvascular lumen sizes. These findings may provide a rationale for the etiology, as well as treatment, of some forms of hypertensive vascular disease.
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              PREVALENCE AND PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF ISCHqMIC HEART-DISEASE IN A HARD-WATER AND IN A SOFT-WATER AREA

               T. Crawford (1967)
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                3669498

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