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      Effects of prepubertal corticosterone treatment on urinary bladder

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          Abstract

          PURPOSE: The aim of this work was to analyze the bladder wall modifications after a chronic treatment with high doses of corticosterone in prepubertal rats. METHODS: This study included 26 male rats assigned into four groups: T30 was treated with corticosterone until 29 days of age and killed at day 30, while T65 group received the same treatment but was killed at day 65. Each group had its own control group (C30 and C65). For treated animals, daily intraperitoneal injections of corticosterone (20 mg/Kg) were administered between 7th and 29th day of life. Bladders were removed and collagen, smooth muscle, elastic fibers system, vascular density and epithelium were analyzed by morphometrical methods, immunofluorescence, and biochemistry. RESULTS: Vascular density in lamina propria was reduced by 40% (p<0.05) in group T65. Collagen organization was altered in T30 and T65, although total collagen concentration was unchanged. The T65 group had an increase in elastic system fibers. There was no difference in epithelial height and cell density between the groups. Concerning the smooth muscle fibers density we observed a 19% increase (p<0.05) in the T65 group. CONCLUSION: Prepubertal administration of corticosterone induces structural modifications in the bladder of rats in a medium term analysis.

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          Most cited references 23

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          Prenatal glucocorticoids and long-term programming.

          Epidemiological evidence suggests that low birth weight is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular, metabolic and neuroendocrine disorders in adult life. Glucocorticoid administration during pregnancy reduces offspring birth weight and alters the maturation of the lung and other organs. We hypothesised that prenatal exposure to excess glucocorticoids or stress might represent a mechanism linking foetal growth with adult pathophysiology. In rats, birth weight is reduced following prenatal exposure to the synthetic steroid dexamethasone, which readily crosses the placenta, or to carbenoxolone, which inhibits 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11beta-HSD2), the physiological feto-placental 'barrier' to maternal glucocorticoids. As adults, the offspring exhibit permanent hypertension, hyperglycaemic, increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and behaviour reminiscent of anxiety. Physiological variations in placental 11beta-HSD2 activity correlate directly with foetal weight. In humans, 11beta-HSD2 gene mutations cause low birth weight. Moreover, low-birth-weight babies have higher plasma cortisol levels throughout adult life, indicating HPA axis programming. The molecular mechanisms may reflect permanent changes in the expression of specific transcription factors, key among which is the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) itself. The differential programming of the GR in different tissues reflects effects upon one or more of the multiple tissue-specific alternate first exons/promoters of the GR gene. Overall, the data suggest that both pharmacological and physiological exposure prenatally to excess glucocorticoids programmes cardiovascular, metabolic and neuroendocrine disorders in adult life.
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            The use of the Picrosirius-polarization method for the study of the biopathology of collagen.

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              Prenatal stress reduces fertility of male offspring in mice, without affecting their adult testosterone levels.

              The male offspring of mice stressed by crowding during the final third of pregnancy showed reductions in sexual behavior and fertility. When paired with receptive females, their latencies to mount and to achieve intromission and ejaculation were greater than controls, and 30% of them failed to ejaculate in the 100-min test. When housed continuously for 4 days with females, 31% of them failed to impregnate their partners, compared with 4% of controls. The sexual receptivity of the untreated females paired with prenatally stressed males was not affected. Resting testosterone levels of prenatally stressed males did not differ from those of controls, and the pattern of rise and fall of testosterone during a 60-min interaction with a female showed only minor differences. The results suggest a central, rather than peripheral, mediation of the behavioral effects of prenatal stress.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                acb
                Acta Cirurgica Brasileira
                Acta Cir. Bras.
                Sociedade Brasileira para o Desenvolvimento da Pesquisa em Cirurgia (São Paulo )
                1678-2674
                2014
                : 29
                : suppl 3
                : 55-59
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                [2 ] Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                [3 ] Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                [4 ] Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                [5 ] Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                [6 ] Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                Article
                S0102-86502014001500055
                10.1590/S0102-86502014001700011
                Product
                Product Information: website
                Categories
                SURGERY

                Surgery

                Bladder, Corticosterone, Morphometry, Rats, Prepubertal

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