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      Efficacy of Bacillus coagulans Unique IS2 in treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in children: a double blind, randomised placebo controlled study

      1 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4

      Beneficial Microbes

      Wageningen Academic Publishers

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          Most cited references 19

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          Probiotics and the gut microbiota in intestinal health and disease.

          The use of probiotics is increasing in popularity for both the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases. While a growing number of well-conducted, prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical trials are emerging and investigations of underlying mechanisms of action are being undertaken, questions remain with respect to the specific immune and physiological effects of probiotics in health and disease. This Review considers recent advances in clinical trials of probiotics for intestinal disorders in both adult and pediatric populations. An overview of recent in vitro and in vivo research related to potential mechanisms of action of various probiotic formulations is also considered.
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            The efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review.

            Probiotics may benefit irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms, but randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been conflicting; therefore a systematic review was conducted. MEDLINE (1966 to May 2008), EMBASE (1988 to May 2008) and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (2008) electronic databases were searched, as were abstracts from DDW (Digestive Diseases Week) and UEGW (United European Gastroenterology Week), and authors were contacted for extra information. Only parallel group RCTs with at least 1 week of treatment comparing probiotics with placebo or no treatment in adults with IBS according to any acceptable definition were included. Studies had to provide improvement in abdominal pain or global IBS symptoms as an outcome. Eligibility assessment and data extraction were performed by two independent researchers. Data were synthesised using relative risk (RR) of symptoms not improving for dichotomous data and standardised mean difference (SMD) for continuous data using random effects models. 19 RCTs (18 papers) in 1650 patients with IBS were identified. Trial quality was generally good, with nine reporting adequate methods of randomisation and six a method of concealment of allocation. There were 10 RCTs involving 918 patients providing outcomes as a dichotomous variable. Probiotics were statistically significantly better than placebo (RR of IBS not improving=0.71; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.88) with a number needed to treat (NNT)=4 (95% CI 3 to 12.5). There was significant heterogeneity (chi(2)=28.3, p=0.001, I(2)=68%) and possible funnel plot asymmetry. Fifteen trials assessing 1351 patients reported on improvement in IBS score as a continuous outcome (SMD=-0.34; 95% CI -0.60 to -0.07). There was statistically significant heterogeneity (chi(2)=67.04, p<0.001, I(2)=79%), but this was explained by one outlying trial. Probiotics appear to be efficacious in IBS, but the magnitude of benefit and the most effective species and strain are uncertain.
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              A role for the gut microbiota in IBS.

              The past decade has witnessed an explosion of knowledge regarding the vast microbial community that resides within our intestine-the gut microbiota. The topic has generated great expectations in terms of gaining a better understanding of disorders ranging from IBD to metabolic disorders and obesity. IBS is a condition for which investigators have long been in search of plausible underlying pathogeneses and it is inevitable that altered composition or function of the gut microbiota will be considered as a potential aetiological factor in at least a subset of patients with IBS. This Review describes the evidence implicating the gut microbiota in not only the expression of the intestinal manifestations of IBS, but also the psychiatric morbidity that coexists in up to 80% of patients with IBS. The evidence described herein ranges from proof-of-concept studies in animals to observational studies and clinical trials in humans. The gut microbiota is subject to influences from a diverse range of factors including diet, antibiotic usage, infection and stress. These factors have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of IBS and further prompt consideration of a role for the gut microbiota in IBS.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Beneficial Microbes
                Beneficial Microbes
                Wageningen Academic Publishers
                1876-2883
                1876-2891
                June 15 2018
                June 15 2018
                : 9
                : 4
                : 563-572
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Centre for Research &amp; Development, Unique Biotech Ltd., Plot No. 2, Phase-II, Alexandria Knowledge Park, Hyderabad, Telangana 500078, India.
                [2 ]Integrity Healthcare Services, Kailas Business Park, Vikhroli, Mumbai 400079, India.
                [3 ]Angel Child Care, S Mistry Road, Antop Hill, Mumbai 400037, India.
                [4 ]Life Veda Treatment and Research Centre, Pandurang Budhkar Marg, Worli, Mumbai 400030, India.
                Article
                10.3920/BM2017.0129
                © 2018

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