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      Putting People Down and Pushing Them Out: Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

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      Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior
      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          Sexual harassment was once conceptualized solely as a sexual problem: coercive sexual advances that spring from natural feelings of sexual desire or romance. Research has since shown that by far the most common manifestation of sexual harassment is gender harassment, which has contempt at its core; this conduct aims to put people down and push them out, not pull them into sexual activity. With findings such as these, we have made many strides in the scientific study of sexual harassment. That body of scholarship is the focus of this article, which is organized around the following questions: What is sexual harassment, both behaviorally and legally? How common is this conduct in work organizations, and what are its consequences? What features of the social/organizational context raise the risk for sexual harassment? What are some promising (and not-so-promising) solutions to this pervasive problem? And finally, what are important directions for this area of research moving forward?

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          Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color

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            Precarious employment: understanding an emerging social determinant of health.

            Employment precariousness is a social determinant that affects the health of workers, families, and communities. Its recent popularity has been spearheaded by three main developments: the surge in "flexible employment" and its associated erosion of workers' employment and working conditions since the mid-1970s; the growing interest in social determinants of health, including employment conditions; and the availability of new data and information systems. This article identifies the historical, economic, and political factors that link precarious employment to health and health equity; reviews concepts, models, instruments, and findings on precarious employment and health inequalities; summarizes the strengths and weaknesses of this literature; and highlights substantive and methodological challenges that need to be addressed. We identify two crucial future aims: to provide a compelling research program that expands our understanding of employment precariousness and to develop and evaluate policy programs that effectively put an end to its health-related impacts.
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              Intersectionality and research in psychology.

              Feminist and critical race theories offer the concept of intersectionality to describe analytic approaches that simultaneously consider the meaning and consequences of multiple categories of identity, difference, and disadvantage. To understand how these categories depend on one another for meaning and are jointly associated with outcomes, reconceptualization of the meaning and significance of the categories is necessary. To accomplish this, the author presents 3 questions for psychologists to ask: Who is included within this category? What role does inequality play? Where are there similarities? The 1st question involves attending to diversity within social categories. The 2nd conceptualizes social categories as connoting hierarchies of privilege and power that structure social and material life. The 3rd looks for commonalities across categories commonly viewed as deeply different. The author concludes with a discussion of the implications and value of these 3 questions for each stage of the research process. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior
                Annu. Rev. Organ. Psychol. Organ. Behav.
                Annual Reviews
                2327-0608
                2327-0616
                January 21 2021
                January 21 2021
                : 8
                : 1
                : 285-309
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychology, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;,
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012420-055606
                b8ebc396-0546-492a-abad-77e644f8d44b
                © 2021
                History

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