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      Stem cells and the impact of ROS signaling.

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          Abstract

          An appropriate balance between self-renewal and differentiation is crucial for stem cell function during both early development and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Recent evidence from both pluripotent embryonic and adult stem cell studies suggests that this balance is partly regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which, in synchrony with metabolism, mediate the cellular redox state. In this Primer, we summarize what ROS are and how they are generated in the cell, as well as their downstream molecular targets. We then review recent findings that provide molecular insights into how ROS signaling can influence stem cell homeostasis and lineage commitment, and discuss the implications of this for reprogramming and stem cell ageing. We conclude that ROS signaling is an emerging key regulator of multiple stem cell populations.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Development
          Development (Cambridge, England)
          1477-9129
          0950-1991
          Nov 2014
          : 141
          : 22
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
          [2 ] Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Multidisciplinary Training Area, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
          [3 ] Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Multidisciplinary Training Area, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA Black Family Stem Cell Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA saghi.ghaffari@mssm.edu.
          Article
          141/22/4206
          10.1242/dev.107086
          25371358
          © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

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