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      A MULTIPLE FUNNEL TRAP FOR SCOLYTID BEETLES (COLEOPTERA)

      The Canadian Entomologist
      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          Abstract

          The multiple funnel trap, an efficient, collapsible, non-sticky trap for scolytid beetles, consists of a series of vertically aligned funnels with a collecting jar at the bottom. The trap compared favorably with sticky traps and Scandinavian drainpipe traps for three species of ambrosia beetles and the mountain pine beetle. Minimum maintenance required for this trap allows for high efficiency in pheromone-based research, survey, and mass trapping of scolytid beetles.

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          Variation in Response of Trypodendron lineatum 1 from Two Continents to Semiochemicals and Trap Form 2

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            An Operational Pheromone-Based Suppression Program for an Ambrosia Beetle, Gnathotrichus sulcatus, in a Commercial Sawmill12

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              Author and article information

              Journal
              applab
              The Canadian Entomologist
              Can Entomol
              Cambridge University Press (CUP)
              0008-347X
              1918-3240
              March 1983
              May 2012
              : 115
              : 03
              : 299-302
              Article
              10.4039/Ent115299-3
              b94c0ebc-ce5b-4569-bf31-60bdb63ea831
              © 1983
              History

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