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      Kidney Disease and Silicosis

      , ,

      Nephron

      S. Karger AG

      Wegener’s granulomatosis, Silicosis, Creatinine, Kidney disease

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          Abstract

          Aim: To determine the prevalence of kidney disease in a cohort of individuals with silicosis. Methods: Review of medical records and questionnaires from patients reported to a state surveillance system for silicosis. Reporting of individuals with silicosis is required by state law. All individuals with silicosis reported as required by law to the State of Michigan. Individuals included in this article were reported from 1987 to 1995. Cases were reported by hospitals, physicians, the state workers’ compensation bureau, or from death certificates. Only individuals who met the criteria for silicosis developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) were included. Results: Medical records were reviewed of 583 individuals with confirmed silicosis. This was mainly a population of elderly men. Ten percent of the 583 silicotics were found to have some mention of chronic kidney disease, and 33% of the 283 silicotics who we had laboratory tests on had a serum creatinine level >1.5 mg/dl. An association between kidney disease and age and between kidney disease and race was found among this cohort of 583 silicotics. Individuals with silicosis were more likely to have a serum creatinine level >1.5 mg/dl than age- and race-matched controls. However, no relationship between duration of exposure to silica or profusion of scarring on chest X-ray and prevalence of kidney disease or elevated creatinine levels was found. Conclusions: This study confirms previous case reports and epidemiologic studies of end-stage renal disease that found an association between kidney disease and exposure to silica. The epidemiologic data are conflicting on the mechanism by which silica causes kidney disease and are compatible with silica being able to cause kidney disease by both an autoimmune and direct nephrotoxic effect. Chronic kidney disease should be considered as a complication of silicosis.

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          Most cited references 2

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          Connective tissue disease and silicosis.

          To determine the prevalence of connective tissue disease in a cohort of individuals with silicosis, we reviewed the medical records and questionnaires from individuals reported from 1987 to 1995 to a state surveillance system for silicosis. Reporting of individuals with silicosis is required by state law. Cases were reported by hospitals, physicians, the state workers' compensation bureau, or from death certificates. Only individuals who met the criteria for silicosis developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) were included in the analysis.
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            End-stage renal disease among silica-exposed gold miners. A new method for assessing incidence among epidemiologic cohorts.

            To examine the association between silica exposure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Retrospective cohort study. A cohort of 2412 white male gold miners was studied. Eligible gold miners worked underground for at least 1 year between 1940 and 1965 in a South Dakota gold mine and were alive on January 1,1977. Of primary interest was exposure to silica. The ESRD Program Management and Medical Information System (PMMIS) was used to identify members of the gold mine cohort who had treated ESRD and to create a US rate file for treated ESRD. The ESRD incidence among the gold miners was compared with that in the US population. Based on the 11 cohort members identified with treated ESRD, the risk for ESRD in the cohort was elevated (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-2.46). The risk was greatest for nonsystemic ESRD (ESRD caused by glomerulonephritis or interstitial nephritis) for which the SIR was 4.22 (95% CI, 1.54-9.19), increasing to 7.70 (95% CI, 1.59-22.48) among workers with 10 or more years of employment underground. To our knowledge this is the first epidemiologic study to examine ESRD incidence in an occupational cohort. This study provides evidence that silica exposure is associated with an increased risk for ESRD, especially ESRD caused by glomerulonephritis. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of the ESRD PMMIS to assess ESRD risk among cohorts exposed to potential nephrotoxins.
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              Author and article information

              Journal
              NEF
              Nephron
              10.1159/issn.1660-8151
              Nephron
              S. Karger AG
              1660-8151
              2235-3186
              2000
              May 2000
              21 April 2000
              : 85
              : 1
              : 14-19
              Affiliations
              Department of Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich., USA
              Article
              45624 Nephron 2000;85:14–19
              10.1159/000045624
              10773750
              © 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

              Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

              Page count
              Tables: 4, References: 23, Pages: 6
              Product
              Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/45624
              Categories
              Original Paper

              Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

              Wegener’s granulomatosis, Creatinine, Kidney disease, Silicosis

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