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      Stem cells. Asymmetric apportioning of aged mitochondria between daughter cells is required for stemness.

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          Abstract

          By dividing asymmetrically, stem cells can generate two daughter cells with distinct fates. However, evidence is limited in mammalian systems for the selective apportioning of subcellular contents between daughters. We followed the fates of old and young organelles during the division of human mammary stemlike cells and found that such cells apportion aged mitochondria asymmetrically between daughter cells. Daughter cells that received fewer old mitochondria maintained stem cell traits. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission disrupted both the age-dependent subcellular localization and segregation of mitochondria and caused loss of stem cell properties in the progeny cells. Hence, mechanisms exist for mammalian stemlike cells to asymmetrically sort aged and young mitochondria, and these are important for maintaining stemness properties.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Science
          Science (New York, N.Y.)
          1095-9203
          0036-8075
          Apr 17 2015
          : 348
          : 6232
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Boston, MA 02142, USA. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 00014, Helsinki, Finland. pekka.katajisto@helsinki.fi sabatini@wi.mit.edu.
          [2 ] Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
          [3 ] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Boston, MA 02142, USA.
          [4 ] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Boston, MA 02142, USA. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
          [5 ] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Boston, MA 02142, USA. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
          [6 ] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Boston, MA 02142, USA. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. pekka.katajisto@helsinki.fi sabatini@wi.mit.edu.
          Article
          science.1260384 NIHMS680973
          10.1126/science.1260384
          25837514
          b96b3c23-ac81-4b42-af70-58b28d5ee412
          Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
          History

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