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Physicochemical Properties, Minerals, Trace Elements, and Heavy Metals in Honey of Different Origins: A Comprehensive Review : Minerals and trace elements in honey …

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      Most cited references 113

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      The kidney, hypertension, and obesity.

       Daniel Hall (2003)
      This paper provides a personal perspective of the role of abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Direct support for a major role of renal-pressure natriuresis in long-term control of arterial pressure and sodium balance comes from studies demonstrating that (1) pressure natriuresis is impaired in all forms of chronic hypertension and (2) prevention of pressure natriuresis from operating, by servo-control of renal perfusion pressure, also prevents the maintenance of sodium balance hypertension. Although the precise mechanisms of impaired pressure natriuresis in essential hypertension have remained elusive, recent evidence suggests that obesity and overweight may play a major role. Obesity increases renal sodium reabsorption and impairs pressure natriuresis by activation of the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems and by altered intrarenal physical forces. Chronic obesity also causes marked structural changes in the kidneys that eventually lead to a loss of nephron function, further increases in arterial pressure, and severe renal injury in some cases. Although there are many unanswered questions about the mechanisms of obesity hypertension and renal disease, this is one of the most promising areas for future research, especially in view of the growing, worldwide "epidemic" of obesity.
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        Identification and quantification of antioxidant components of honeys from various floral sources.

        Little is known about the individual components of honey that are responsible for its antioxidant activity. The present study was carried out to characterize the phenolics and other antioxidants present in honeys from seven floral sources. Chromatograms of the phenolic nonpolar fraction of the honeys indicated that most honeys have similar but quantitatively different phenolic profiles. Many of the flavonoids and phenolic acids identified have been previously described as potent antioxidants. A linear correlation between phenolic content and ORAC activity was demonstrated (R(2) = 0.963, p < 0.0001). Honeys were separated by solid-phase extraction into four fractions for sugar removal and separation based on solubility to identify the relative contribution of each fraction to the antioxidant activity of honey. Antioxidant analysis of the different honey fractions suggested that the water-soluble fraction contained most of the antioxidant components. Specific water-soluble antioxidant components were quantified, including protein; gluconic acid; ascorbic acid; hydroxymethylfuraldehyde; and the combined activities of the enzymes glucose oxidase, catalase and peroxidase. Of these components, a significant correlation could be established only between protein content and ORAC activity (R(2) = 0.674, p = 0.024). In general, the antioxidant capacity of honey appeared to be a result of the combined activity of a wide range of compounds including phenolics, peptides, organic acids, enzymes, Maillard reaction products, and possibly other minor components. The phenolic compounds contributed significantly to the antioxidant capacity of honey but were not solely responsible for it.
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          A review of the analytical methods to determine the geographical and botanical origin of honey

           Elke Anklam (1998)
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Jahangirnagar Univ; Savar Dhaka 1342 Bangladesh
            [2 ]Human Genome Centre; School of Medical Sciences, Univ. Sains Malaysia; 16150 Kubang Kerian Kelantan Malaysia
            [3 ]Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences; Univ. Sains Malaysia; 16150 Kubang Kerian Kelantan Malaysia
            Journal
            Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety
            COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY
            Wiley
            15414337
            January 2016
            January 2016
            November 18 2015
            : 15
            : 1
            : 219-233
            10.1111/1541-4337.12182
            © 2015

            http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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