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      Production of the antimicrobial compound tetrabromopyrrole and the Pseudomonas quinolone system precursor, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone, by a novel marine species Pseudoalteromonas galatheae sp. nov.

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          Abstract

          Novel antimicrobials are urgently needed due to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria. In a genome-wide analysis of Pseudoalteromonas strains, one strain (S4498) was noticed due to its potent antibiotic activity. It did not produce the yellow antimicrobial pigment bromoalterochromide, which was produced by several related type strains with which it shared less than 95% average nucleotide identity. Also, it produced a sweet-smelling volatile not observed from other strains. Mining the genome of strain S4498 using the secondary metabolite prediction tool antiSMASH led to eight biosynthetic gene clusters with no homology to known compounds, and synteny analyses revealed that the yellow pigment bromoalterochromide was likely lost during evolution. Metabolome profiling of strain S4498 using HPLC-HRMS analyses revealed marked differences to the type strains. In particular, a series of quinolones known as pseudanes were identified and verified by NMR. The characteristic odor of the strain was linked to the pseudanes. The highly halogenated compound tetrabromopyrrole was detected as the major antibacterial component by bioassay-guided fractionation. Taken together, the polyphasic analysis demonstrates that strain S4498 belongs to a novel species within the genus Pseudoalteromonas, and we propose the name Pseudoalteromonas galatheae sp. nov. (type strain S4498 T = NCIMB 15250 T = LMG 31599 T).

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          SPAdes: a new genome assembly algorithm and its applications to single-cell sequencing.

          The lion's share of bacteria in various environments cannot be cloned in the laboratory and thus cannot be sequenced using existing technologies. A major goal of single-cell genomics is to complement gene-centric metagenomic data with whole-genome assemblies of uncultivated organisms. Assembly of single-cell data is challenging because of highly non-uniform read coverage as well as elevated levels of sequencing errors and chimeric reads. We describe SPAdes, a new assembler for both single-cell and standard (multicell) assembly, and demonstrate that it improves on the recently released E+V-SC assembler (specialized for single-cell data) and on popular assemblers Velvet and SoapDeNovo (for multicell data). SPAdes generates single-cell assemblies, providing information about genomes of uncultivatable bacteria that vastly exceeds what may be obtained via traditional metagenomics studies. SPAdes is available online ( http://bioinf.spbau.ru/spades ). It is distributed as open source software.
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            MUSCLE: multiple sequence alignment with high accuracy and high throughput.

            We describe MUSCLE, a new computer program for creating multiple alignments of protein sequences. Elements of the algorithm include fast distance estimation using kmer counting, progressive alignment using a new profile function we call the log-expectation score, and refinement using tree-dependent restricted partitioning. The speed and accuracy of MUSCLE are compared with T-Coffee, MAFFT and CLUSTALW on four test sets of reference alignments: BAliBASE, SABmark, SMART and a new benchmark, PREFAB. MUSCLE achieves the highest, or joint highest, rank in accuracy on each of these sets. Without refinement, MUSCLE achieves average accuracy statistically indistinguishable from T-Coffee and MAFFT, and is the fastest of the tested methods for large numbers of sequences, aligning 5000 sequences of average length 350 in 7 min on a current desktop computer. The MUSCLE program, source code and PREFAB test data are freely available at http://www.drive5. com/muscle.
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              Prokka: rapid prokaryotic genome annotation.

              T Seemann (2014)
              The multiplex capability and high yield of current day DNA-sequencing instruments has made bacterial whole genome sequencing a routine affair. The subsequent de novo assembly of reads into contigs has been well addressed. The final step of annotating all relevant genomic features on those contigs can be achieved slowly using existing web- and email-based systems, but these are not applicable for sensitive data or integrating into computational pipelines. Here we introduce Prokka, a command line software tool to fully annotate a draft bacterial genome in about 10 min on a typical desktop computer. It produces standards-compliant output files for further analysis or viewing in genome browsers. Prokka is implemented in Perl and is freely available under an open source GPLv2 license from http://vicbioinformatics.com/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                gram@bio.dtu.dk
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                10 December 2020
                10 December 2020
                2020
                : 10
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.5170.3, ISNI 0000 0001 2181 8870, Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, , Technical University of Denmark, ; Søltofts Plads 221, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
                Article
                78439
                10.1038/s41598-020-78439-3
                7730127
                33303891
                b9be8b19-d488-4835-bc8d-7e9e9030b405
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100008397, Velux Fonden;
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100008393, Teknologi og Produktion, Det Frie Forskningsråd;
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001732, Danmarks Grundforskningsfond;
                Categories
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                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Uncategorized
                biologics,environmental biotechnology,sequencing
                Uncategorized
                biologics, environmental biotechnology, sequencing

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