16
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Honokiol induces apoptosis and autophagy via the ROS/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, the long-term survival of which has stagnated in the past several decades. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effect of honokiol (HNK), an active component isolated and purified from the magnolia officinalis on human osteosarcoma cells. Our results showed that honokiol caused dose-dependent and time-dependent cell death in human osteosarcoma cells. The types of cell death induced by honokiol were primarily autophagy and apoptosis. Furthermore, honokiol induced G0/G1 phase arrest, elevated the levels of glucose-regulated protein (GRP)−78, an endoplasmic reticular stress (ERS)-associated protein, and increased the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, reducing production of intracellular ROS using N-acetylcysteine, a scavenger of ROS, concurrently suppressed honokiol-induced cellular apoptosis, autophagy, and cell cycle arrest. Consequently, honokiol stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Furthermore, pretreatment of osteosarcoma cells with PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK1/2, inhibited honokiol-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Finally, honokiol suppressed tumor growth in the mouse xenograft model. Taken together, our results revealed that honokiol caused G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis, and autophagy via the ROS/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in human osteosarcoma cells. Honokiol is therefore a promising candidate for development of antitumor drugs targeting osteosarcoma.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 46

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in apoptosis induction.

          Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria play an important role in apoptosis induction under both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Interestingly, mitochondria are both source and target of ROS. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria, that triggers caspase activation, appears to be largely mediated by direct or indirect ROS action. On the other hand, ROS have also anti-apoptotic effects. This review focuses on the role of ROS in the regulation of apoptosis, especially in inflammatory cells.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Life and death partners: apoptosis, autophagy and the cross-talk between them.

            It is not surprising that the demise of a cell is a complex well-controlled process. Apoptosis, the first genetically programmed death process identified, has been extensively studied and its contribution to the pathogenesis of disease well documented. Yet, apoptosis does not function alone to determine a cell's fate. More recently, autophagy, a process in which de novo-formed membrane-enclosed vesicles engulf and consume cellular components, has been shown to engage in a complex interplay with apoptosis. In some cellular settings, it can serve as a cell survival pathway, suppressing apoptosis, and in others, it can lead to death itself, either in collaboration with apoptosis or as a back-up mechanism when the former is defective. The molecular regulators of both pathways are inter-connected; numerous death stimuli are capable of activating either pathway, and both pathways share several genes that are critical for their respective execution. The cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy is therefore quite complex, and sometimes contradictory, but surely critical to the overall fate of the cell. Furthermore, the cross-talk is a key factor in the outcome of death-related pathologies such as cancer, its development and treatment.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The stress-activated protein kinase subfamily of c-Jun kinases.

              The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases Erk-1 and Erk-2 are proline-directed kinases that are themselves activated through concomitant phosphorylation of tyrosine and threonine residues. The kinase p54 (M(r) 54,000), which was first isolated from cycloheximide-treated rats, is proline-directed like Erks-1/2, and requires both Tyr and Ser/Thr phosphorylation for activity. p54 is, however, distinct from Erks-1/2 in its substrate specificity, being unable to phosphorylate pp90rsk but more active in phosphorylating the c-Jun transactivation domain. Molecular cloning of p54 reveals a unique subfamily of extracellularly regulated kinases. Although they are 40-45% identical in sequence to Erks-1/2, unlike Erks-1/2 the p54s are only poorly activated in most cells by mitogens or phorbol esters. However, p54s are the principal c-Jun N-terminal kinases activated by cellular stress and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, hence they are designated stress-activated protein kinases, or SAPKs. SAPKs are also activated by sphingomyelinase, which elicits a subset of cellular responses to TNF-alpha (ref. 9). SAPKs therefore define a new TNF-alpha and stress-activated signalling pathway, possibly initiated by sphingomyelin-based second messengers, which regulates the activity of c-Jun.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                +86-571-86006667 , xiangqian_fangsrr@163.com
                +86-571-86006667 , 11207057@zju.edu.cn
                Journal
                Cell Death Dis
                Cell Death Dis
                Cell Death & Disease
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2041-4889
                6 February 2018
                6 February 2018
                February 2018
                : 9
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1759 700X, GRID grid.13402.34, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, , Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Medical College of Zhejiang University, ; 3 East Qingchun Road, Hangzhou, 310016 China
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1759 700X, GRID grid.13402.34, Department of Surgical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, , Medical College of Zhejiang University, ; Hangzhou, 310003 China
                [3 ]GRID grid.452511.6, Department of Neurosurgery, , Children’s hospital of Nanjing Medical University, ; Nanjing City, China
                Article
                166
                10.1038/s41419-017-0166-5
                5833587
                29410403
                ba356cb3-6b63-420f-8379-062474b79f19
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Cell biology

                Comments

                Comment on this article