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      Is Open Access

      Curcuma purpurascens BI. rhizome accelerates rat excisional wound healing: involvement of Hsp70/Bax proteins, antioxidant defense, and angiogenesis activity

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          Curcuma purpurascens BI. is a member of Zingiberaceae family. The purpose of this study is to investigate the wound healing properties of hexane extract of C. purpurascens rhizome (HECP) against excisional wound healing in rats.

          Materials and methods

          Twenty four rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: A) negative control (blank placebo, acacia gum), B) low dose of HECP, C) high dose of HECP, and D) positive control, with 6 rats in each group. Full-thickness incisions (approximately 2.00 cm) were made on the neck area of each rat. Groups 1–4 were treated two-times a day for 20 days with blank placebo, HECP (100 mg/kg), HECP (200 mg/kg), and intrasite gel as a positive control, respectively. After 20 days, hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome stainings were employed to investigate the histopathological alterations. Protein expressions of Bax and Hsp70 were examined in the wound tissues using immunohistochemistry analysis. In addition, levels of enzymatic antioxidants and malondialdehyde representing lipid peroxidation were measured in wound tissue homogenates.

          Results

          Macroscopic evaluation of wounds showed conspicuous elevation in wound contraction after topical administration of HECP at both doses. Moreover, histopathological analysis revealed noteworthy reduction in the scar width correlated with the enhanced collagen content and fibroblast cells, accompanied by a reduction of inflammatory cells in the granulation tissues. At the molecular level, HECP facilitates wound-healing process by downregulating Bax and upregulating Hsp70 protein at the wound site. The formation of new blood vessel was observed in Masson’s trichrome staining of wounds treated with HECP (100 and 200 mg/kg). In addition, HECP administration caused a significant surge in enzymatic antioxidant activities and a decline in lipid peroxidation.

          Conclusion

          These findings suggested that HECP accelerated wound-healing process in rats via antioxidant activity, angiogenesis effect and anti-inflammatory responses involving Hsp70/Bax.

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          Most cited references 44

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          Wound healing: an overview of acute, fibrotic and delayed healing.

          Acute wounds normally heal in a very orderly and efficient manner characterized by four distinct, but overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling. Specific biological markers characterize healing of acute wounds. Likewise, unique biologic markers also characterize pathologic responses resulting in fibrosis and chronic non-healing ulcers. This review describes the major biological processes associated with both normal and pathologic healing. The normal healing response begins the moment the tissue is injured. As the blood components spill into the site of injury, the platelets come into contact with exposed collagen and other elements of the extracellular matrix. This contact triggers the platelets to release clotting factors as well as essential growth factors and cytokines such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Following hemostasis, the neutrophils then enter the wound site and begin the critical task of phagocytosis to remove foreign materials, bacteria and damaged tissue. As part of this inflammatory phase, the macrophages appear and continue the process of phagocytosis as well as releasing more PDGF and TGF beta. Once the wound site is cleaned out, fibroblasts migrate in to begin the proliferative phase and deposit new extracellular matrix. The new collagen matrix then becomes cross-linked and organized during the final remodeling phase. In order for this efficient and highly controlled repair process to take place, there are numerous cell-signaling events that are required. In pathologic conditions such as non-healing pressure ulcers, this efficient and orderly process is lost and the ulcers are locked into a state of chronic inflammation characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration with associated reactive oxygen species and destructive enzymes. Healing proceeds only after the inflammation is controlled. On the opposite end of the spectrum, fibrosis is characterized by excessive matrix deposition and reduced remodeling. Often fibrotic lesions are associated with increased densities of mast cells. By understanding the functional relationships of these biological processes of normal compared to abnormal wound healing, hopefully new strategies can be designed to treat the pathological conditions.
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            Oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of skin disease.

            Skin is the largest body organ that serves as an important environmental interface providing a protective envelope that is crucial for homeostasis. On the other hand, the skin is a major target for toxic insult by a broad spectrum of physical (i.e. UV radiation) and chemical (xenobiotic) agents that are capable of altering its structure and function. Many environmental pollutants are either themselves oxidants or catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) directly or indirectly. ROS are believed to activate proliferative and cell survival signaling that can alter apoptotic pathways that may be involved in the pathogenesis of a number of skin disorders including photosensitivity diseases and some types of cutaneous malignancy. ROS act largely by driving several important molecular pathways that play important roles in diverse pathologic processes including ischemia-reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and inflammatory responses. The skin possesses an array of defense mechanisms that interact with toxicants to obviate their deleterious effect. These include non-enzymatic and enzymatic molecules that function as potent antioxidants or oxidant-degrading systems. Unfortunately, these homeostatic defenses, although highly effective, have limited capacity and can be overwhelmed thereby leading to increased ROS in the skin that can foster the development of dermatological diseases. One approach to preventing or treating these ROS-mediated disorders is based on the administration of various antioxidants in an effort to restore homeostasis. Although many antioxidants have shown substantive efficacy in cell culture systems and in animal models of oxidant injury, unequivocal confirmation of their beneficial effects in human populations has proven elusive.
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              Lipid peroxidation and antioxidants as biomarkers of tissue damage.

              Disturbance of the balance between the production of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide; hydrogen peroxide; hypochlorous acid; hydroxyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals; and antioxidant defenses against them produces oxidative stress, which amplifies tissue damage by releasing prooxidative forms of reactive iron that are able to drive Fenton chemistry and lipid peroxidation and by eroding away protective sacrificial antioxidants. The body has a hierarchy of defense strategies to deal with oxidative stress within different cellular compartments, and superimposed on these are gene-regulated defenses involving the heat-shock and oxidant stress proteins.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2015
                27 October 2015
                : 9
                : 5805-5813
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                [2 ]Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                [3 ]Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                [4 ]Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Elham Rouhollahi, Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Tel +60 3 7967 5725, Fax +60 3 7967 4791, Email elhamrouhollahi@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                dddt-9-5805
                10.2147/DDDT.S88196
                4629958
                26604683
                © 2015 Rouhollahi et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

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