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      A new species of Omphale Haliday 1833 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) from Brazil, parasitic on gall-midges on Croton floribundus Spreng (Euphorbiaceae) Translated title: Uma nova espécie de Omphale Haliday 1833 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) do Brasil, parasitoide de galhas em Croton floribundus Spreng (Euphorbiaceae)

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          Abstract

          A tritrophic relationship involving the plant Croton floribundusSpreng (Euphorbiaceae), an unidentified gall-midge belonging to eitherClinodiplosis Kieffer 1895 or Alycaulus Rübsaamen 1916 (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), and a new species of parasitic wasp belonging toOmphale Haliday 1833 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is described. The gall andOmphale japii sp. nov., are described and illustrated. This is the third record ofOmphale from Brazil and the new species is compared to otherOmphale species from the Neotropical region.

          Translated abstract

          Neste estudo foi descrita a relação tritrófica envolvendo a planta Croton floribundus Spreng (Euphorbiaceae), um galhador não-identificado pertencente à Clinodiplosis Kieffer 1895 ouAlycaulus Rübsaamen 1916 (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), e uma nova espécie de vespa parasitoide pertencente à Omphale Haliday 1833 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae). A galha e Omphale japii sp. nov., foram descritas e ilustradas. Este é o terceiro registro de Omphale no Brasil e a nova espécie foi comparada a outras espécies de Omphale da região Neotropical.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Dicionário de Plantas Úteis do Brasil e das Exóticas Cultivadas

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            Collecting and preserving chalcid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea)

             John S. Noyes (2007)
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              Insect galls from Serra de São José (Tiradentes, MG, Brazil)

              One hundred thirty-seven morphotypes of insect galls were found on 73 plant species (47 genera and 30 families) in Serra de São José, in Tiradentes, MG, Brazil. Fabaceae, Myrtaceae, Asteraceae, and Melastomataceae were the plant families that supported most of the galls (49.6% of the total). Galls were mostly found on leaves and stems (66.4% and 25.5%, respectively). Galls were induced by Diptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hemiptera (Sternorrhyncha), Hymenoptera, and Thysanoptera. The majority of them (73.7%) were induced by gall midges (Cecidomyiidae: Diptera). Besides the gall inducers, other insects found associated with the galls were parasitoids (Hymenoptera), inquilines (Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, and Hemiptera), and predators (Diptera).
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                bn
                Biota Neotropica
                Biota Neotrop.
                Instituto Virtual da Biodiversidade | BIOTA - FAPESP (Campinas )
                1676-0611
                September 2013
                : 13
                : 3
                : 34-37
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Universidade Estadual de Campinas Brazil
                [2 ] the Natural History Museum United Kingdom
                Article
                S1676-06032013000300034
                10.1590/S1676-06032013000300003
                Product
                Product Information: website
                Categories
                BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

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