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      p53, guardian of the genome

      Nature

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Most cited references 15

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          Mice deficient for p53 are developmentally normal but susceptible to spontaneous tumours.

          Mutations in the p53 tumour-suppressor gene are the most frequently observed genetic lesions in human cancers. To investigate the role of the p53 gene in mammalian development and tumorigenesis, a null mutation was introduced into the gene by homologous recombination in murine embryonic stem cells. Mice homozygous for the null allele appear normal but are prone to the spontaneous development of a variety of neoplasms by 6 months of age. These observations indicate that a normal p53 gene is dispensable for embryonic development, that its absence predisposes the animal to neoplastic disease, and that an oncogenic mutant form of p53 is not obligatory for the genesis of many types of tumours.
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            p53 mutations in human cancers

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              The mdm-2 oncogene product forms a complex with the p53 protein and inhibits p53-mediated transactivation.

              A cellular phosphoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 90 kd (p90) that forms a complex with both mutant and wild-type p53 protein has been characterized, purified, and identified. The protein was identified as a product of the murine double minute 2 gene (mdm-2). The mdm-2 gene enhances the tumorigenic potential of cells when it is overexpressed and encodes a putative transcription factor. To determine if mdm-2 could modulate p53 transactivation, a p53-responsive element from the muscle creatine kinase gene was employed. A wild-type p53-expressing plasmid enhanced the expression of the p53-responsive element when cotransfected into cells that contain no endogenous p53. When a cosmid expressing mdm-2 was transfected with this p53-expressing plasmid, the transactivation of the p53-responsive element was inhibited. Thus, a product of the mdm-2 oncogene forms a tight complex with the p53 protein, and the mdm-2 oncogene can inhibit p53-mediated transactivation.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                July 1992
                July 1992
                : 358
                : 6381
                : 15-16
                Article
                10.1038/358015a0
                1614522
                © 1992

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