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      Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Increases Baroreflex Gain and Peak Expiratory Flow :

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          Assessment of baroreceptor reflex sensitivity by means of spectral analysis.

          A method of determining baroreceptor reflex sensitivity is proposed that is based on spectral analysis of systolic pressure values and RR interval times, namely, the modulus (or gain) in the mid frequency band (0.07-0.14 Hz) between these two signals. Results using this method were highly correlated (0.94; n = 8) with results of the phenylephrine method. In addition, compared with the values for the preceding rest period, the modulus decreased during mental challenge, as might be expected from the literature.
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            Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate: a predictor of sudden cardiac death.

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              Slow breathing increases arterial baroreflex sensitivity in patients with chronic heart failure.

              It is well established that a depressed baroreflex sensitivity may adversely influence the prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and in those with previous myocardial infarction. We tested whether a slow breathing rate (6 breaths/min) could modify the baroreflex sensitivity in 81 patients with stable (2 weeks) CHF (age, 58+/-1 years; NYHA classes I [6 patients], II [33], III [27], and IV [15]) and in 21 controls. Slow breathing induced highly significant increases in baroreflex sensitivity, both in controls (from 9.4+/-0.7 to 13.8+/-1.0 ms/mm Hg, P<0.0025) and in CHF patients (from 5.0+/-0.3 to 6.1+/-0.5 ms/mm Hg, P<0.0025), which correlated with the value obtained during spontaneous breathing (r=+0.202, P=0.047). In addition, systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased in CHF patients (systolic, from 117+/-3 to 110+/-4 mm Hg, P=0.009; diastolic, from 62+/-1 to 59+/-1 mm Hg, P=0.02). These data suggest that in patients with CHF, slow breathing, in addition to improving oxygen saturation and exercise tolerance as has been previously shown, may be beneficial by increasing baroreflex sensitivity.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psychosomatic Medicine
                Psychosomatic Medicine
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0033-3174
                2003
                September 2003
                : 65
                : 5
                : 796-805
                Article
                10.1097/01.PSY.0000089200.81962.19
                bad951e2-f3f1-4c78-87e6-19b4eb5f258e
                © 2003

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