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      The effects of a formal exercise training programme on salivary hormone concentrations and body composition in previously sedentary aging men

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          Abstract

          Alteration in body composition, physical function, and substrate metabolism occur with advancing age. These changes may be attenuated by exercise. This study examined whether twenty eight, previously sedentary males (62.5 ± 5.3 years of age; body mass of 89.7 ± 16.4 kg) adhering to the ACSM minimum guidelines for aerobic exercise for six weeks would improve exercise capabilities, body composition and salivary hormone profiles. After six weeks of adhering to the guidelines, salivary testosterone and vo 2max (absolute and relative) increased (p < 0.05), whilst body fat percentage and body mass decreased (p < 0.05). Peak power output, fat free mass and cortisol values were not significantly different. Interestingly, salivary testosterone correlated inversely with body fat percentage (R 2 = .285, p = 0.011). These results suggest that despite previous inactivity, older males can achieve improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition and anabolism by adhering to simple lifestyle changes.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Predictors of skeletal muscle mass in elderly men and women.

          Elderly men and women lose muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Decreased physical activity, hormones, malnutrition and chronic disease have been identified as factors contributing to this loss. There are few data, however, for their multivariate associations with muscle mass and strength. This study analyzes these associations in a cross-sectional sample of elderly people from the New Mexico Aging Process Study. Data collected in 1994 for 121 male and 180 female volunteers aged 65-97 years of age enrolled in The New Mexico Aging Process Study were analyzed. Body composition was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; dietary intake from 3 day food records; usual physical activity by questionnaire; health status from annual physical examinations; and serum testosterone, estrone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) from radioimmunoassays of fasting blood samples. Statistical analyses included partial correlation and stepwise multiple regression. The muscle mass and strength (adjusted for knee height) decreased with increasing age in both sexes. The muscle mass was significantly associated with serum free-testosterone, physical activity, cardiovascular disease, and IGF1 in the men. In the women, the muscle mass was significantly associated with total fat mass and physical activity. Age was not associated significantly with muscle mass after controlling for these variables. Grip strength was associated with age independent of muscle mass in both sexes. Estrogen (endogenous and exogenous) was not associated with muscle mass or strength in women. Age-related loss of muscle mass and strength occurs in relatively healthy, well-nourished elderly men and women and has a multifactorial basis. Sex hormone status is an important factor in men but not in women. Physical activity is an important predictor of muscle mass in both sexes.
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            Update--Ethical standards in sport and exercise science research.

             G Atkinson,  D Harriss (2011)
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              Age Trends in the Level of Serum Testosterone and Other Hormones in Middle-Aged Men: Longitudinal Results from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study

               H Feldman (2002)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                L.Hayes@Londonmet.ac.uk
                Fergal.grace@uws.ac.uk
                nick.sculthorpe@beds.ac.uk
                p.herbert@tsd.ac.uk
                John.ratcliffe@uws.ac.uk
                l.kilduff@swansea.ac.uk
                jsbaker@uws.ac.uk
                Journal
                Springerplus
                Springerplus
                Springerplus
                Springer International Publishing AG (Cham )
                2193-1801
                22 January 2013
                22 January 2013
                December 2013
                : 2
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Clinical Exercise and Health Science, University of the West of Scotland, Hamilton, Scotland
                [2 ]School of Human Sciences, London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB UK
                [3 ]Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Bedfordshire, Bedfordshire, UK
                [4 ]School of Sport, Health and Outdoor Education, Trinity Saint David, University of Wales, Wales, UK
                [5 ]Department of Sports Science, Swansea University, Swansea, UK
                Article
                54
                10.1186/2193-1801-2-18
                3566381
                23396630
                © Hayes et al.; licensee Springer. 2013
                Categories
                Research
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2013

                Uncategorized

                aging, cortisol, physical activity, sarcopenia, testosterone

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