3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Regret and Unfinished Business in Parents Bereaved by Cancer: A Mixed Methods Study

      research-article

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Prior research has demonstrated that the presence of regret and unfinished business is associated with poorer adjustment in bereavement. Though there is a growing literature on these constructs among caregivers of adult patients, the literature on regret and unfinished business in bereaved parents has been limited.

          Aim

          The aim of this study was to examine regret and unfinished business in parents bereaved by cancer, as well as their associations with caregiving experiences and prolonged grief.

          Design

          This was a cross-sectional mixed methods study that utilized self-report questionnaires with open-ended items.

          Setting/participants

          The multisite study took place at a tertiary cancer hospital and paediatric cancer clinical research institution. Participants were 118 parents (mothers = 82, fathers = 36) who lost a child aged 6 months to 25 years to cancer between 6 months and 6 years prior.

          Results

          Results showed that 73% of parents endorsed regret and 33% endorsed unfinished business, both of which were more common among mothers than fathers ( p≤.05). Parents were on average moderately distressed by their regrets and unfinished business, and both regret-related and unfinished business-related distress were associated with distress while caregiving and prolonged grief symptoms.

          Conclusions

          Findings have implications for how providers work with families, including increasing treatment decision-making support, supporting parents in speaking to their child about illness, and, in bereavement, validating choices made. Grief interventions that use cognitive-behavioral and meaning-centered approaches may be particularly beneficial.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          8704926
          2617
          Palliat Med
          Palliat Med
          Palliative medicine
          0269-2163
          1477-030X
          11 July 2020
          05 February 2020
          March 2020
          19 August 2020
          : 34
          : 3
          : 367-377
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
          [2 ]Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA
          [3 ]LifeSpark, Nashville, TN, USA
          [4 ]Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA
          [5 ]St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA
          [6 ]The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA
          [7 ]National Cancer Institute Pediatric Oncology Branch, Bethesda, MD, USA
          Author notes

          Authorship: Lichtenthal: Conception and design of the work; acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of data; drafting and revising the work for important intellectual content. Roberts: Analysis and interpretation of data; drafting and revising the work for important intellectual content. Catarozoli: Acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of data; drafting and revising the work for important intellectual content. Schofield: Analysis and interpretation of data; drafting and revising the work for important intellectual content. Holland: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Fogarty: Analysis of data; drafting and revising the work for important intellectual content. Coats: Analysis of data; drafting and revising the work for important intellectual content. Barakat: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Baker: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Brinkman: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Neimeyer: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Prigerson: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Zaider: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Breitbart: Interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content. Wiener: Conception and design of the work; acquisition and interpretation of data; revising the work for important intellectual content.

          Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to: Wendy Lichtenthal, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 641 Lexington Avenue, 7 th Floor, New York, NY 10065, Phone: (646) 888-4812, lichtenw@ 123456mskcc.org
          Article
          PMC7438163 PMC7438163 7438163 nihpa1609922
          10.1177/0269216319900301
          7438163
          32020837
          bb09460d-c353-4690-9b98-f30017e9aabe
          Categories
          Article

          grief, neoplasm, paediatric, regret, decision making, caregivers

          Comments

          Comment on this article