1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Influence of lens opacities and cataract severity on quantitative fundus autofluorescence as a secondary outcome of a randomized clinical trial

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of age-related lens opacities and advanced cataract, quantified by LOCS III grading, on quantitative autofluorescence (qAF) measurements in patients before and after cataract surgery. Images from a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of femtosecond-laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) on retinal thickness were analyzed post-hoc. One-hundred and twenty eyes from 60 consecutive patients with age-related cataract were included and assessed with qAF and optical coherence tomography (OCT) before, 1, 3 and 6 weeks after cataract surgery (randomized 1:1 to FLACS or phacoemulsification). LOCS III grading was performed before surgery. Pre- to post-surgical qAF values, as well as the impact of LOCS III gradings, surgery technique, gender, axial length and age on post-surgery qAF values was investigated using generalized linear mixed models. For this analysis, 106 eyes from 53 patients were usable. No difference in qAF was found between FLACS and phacoemulsification (p > 0.05) and results were pooled for the total cohort. Mean pre-surgical qAF was 89.45 ± 44.9 qAF units, with a significant mean increase of 178.4–191.6% after surgery (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between the three follow-up visits after surgery (p > 0.05). Higher LOCS III cortical opacity quantifications were associated with a significantly greater increase in qAF after surgery (estimate: 98.56, p = 0.006) and nuclear opacities showed a trend toward an increased change (estimate: 48.8, p = 0.095). Considerable interactions were identified between baseline qAF and cortical opacities, nuclear opacities and posterior subcapsular opacities, as well as nuclear opacities and cortical opacities (p = 0.012, p = 0.064 and p = 0.069, respectively). Quantitative autofluorescence signals are significantly reconstituted after cataract surgery and LOCS III gradings are well associated with post-surgical qAF values. Careful consideration of age-related lens opacities is vital for the correct interpretation of qAF, especially in retinal diseases affecting the elderly.

          ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03465124.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Multimodel Inference: Understanding AIC and BIC in Model Selection

           K. Burnham (2004)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The Lens Opacities Classification System III

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              In vivo fluorescence of the ocular fundus exhibits retinal pigment epithelium lipofuscin characteristics.

              To characterize the intrinsic fluorescence (autofluorescence) of the human ocular fundus with regard to its excitation and emission spectra, age relationship, retinal location, and topography, and to identify the dominant fluorophore among the fundus layers. Using a novel fundus spectrophotometer, fluorescence measurements were made at 7 degrees temporal to the fovea and at the fovea in 30 normal subjects and in 3 selected patients. Topographic measurements were made in 3 subjects. Ex vivo measurements of fluorescence of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were obtained and compared to in vivo data. Fundus fluorescence reveals a broad band of emission between 500 and 750 nm, a maximum of approximately 630 nm, and optimal excitation of approximately 510 nm. Exhibiting a significant increase with age, this fluorescence is highest at 7 degrees to 15 degrees from the fovea, shows a well-defined foveal minimum, and decreases toward the periphery. In vivo fluorescence spectra are consistent with those obtained ex vivo on human RPE. Measurements with short wavelength excitation are strongly influenced by ocular media absorption and reveal an additional minor fluorophore in the fovea. Spectral characteristics, correlation with age, topographic distribution, and retinal location between the choriocapillaris and the photoreceptors suggest that the dominant fundus fluorophore is RPE lipofuscin. The minor fluorophore is probably in the neurosensory retina but has not been identified.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                ursula.schmidt-erfurth@meduniwien.ac.at
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                16 June 2021
                16 June 2021
                2021
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.22937.3d, ISNI 0000 0000 9259 8492, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Ophthalmic Image Analysis, Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, , Medical University of Vienna, ; Vienna, Austria
                [2 ]GRID grid.22937.3d, ISNI 0000 0000 9259 8492, Vienna Clinical Trial Center (VTC), Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, , Medical University of Vienna, ; Vienna, Austria
                [3 ]GRID grid.22937.3d, ISNI 0000 0000 9259 8492, Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, , Medical University of Vienna, ; Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria
                Article
                92309
                10.1038/s41598-021-92309-6
                8209039
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Uncategorized

                lens diseases, retinal diseases

                Comments

                Comment on this article