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      Contextualizing Innovative Housing Models and Services Within the Age-Friendly Communities Framework

      1 , 1 , 1 , 1
      The Gerontologist
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          This article compares and contrasts the characteristics of 3 models of housing and services for older adults, cohousing, Naturally Occurring Retirement Community Supportive Services Program, and villages, and links them to the domains of the age-friendly communities (AFCs) framework, specifically (a) services, supports, and information; (b) respect, inclusion, and diversity; (c) social and civic participation; and (d) affordability. We discuss key barriers and challenges of these models with respect to the AFC domains, as well as implementation and sustainability. Consideration of these models in age-friendly housing policy and practice could help expand and diversify the choices in the housing and services continuum. This aligns with AFC’s emphasis on the need for housing and services responsive to older adults’ diverse health and social needs, provides options that balance autonomy, choice, and support, and emphasizes older adults’ participation and involvement in tailoring these options.

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          Most cited references42

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          Is Open Access

          Social isolation and loneliness among older adults in the context of COVID-19: a global challenge

          Bei Wu (2020)
          We are experiencing a historical moment with an unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 global pandemic. The outbreak of COVID-19 will have a long-term and profound impact on older adults’ health and well-being. Social isolation and loneliness are likely to be one of the most affected health outcomes. Social isolation and loneliness are major risk factors that have been linked with poor physical and mental health status. This paper discusses several approaches that may address the issues of social isolation and loneliness. These approaches include promoting social connection as public health messaging, mobilizing the resources from family members, community-based networks and resources, developing innovative technology-based interventions to improve social connections, and engaging the health care system to begin the process of developing methods to identify social isolation and loneliness in health care settings.
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            Conceptualizing age-friendly communities.

            On the political and policy front, interest has increased in making communities more "age-friendly", an ongoing trend since the World Health Organization launched its global Age-Friendly Cities project. We conceptualize age-friendly communities by building on the WHO framework and applying an ecological perspective. We thereby aim to make explicit key assumptions of the interplay between the person and the environment to advance research or policy decisions in this area. Ecological premises (e.g., there must be a fit between the older adult and environmental conditions) suggest the need for a holistic and interdisciplinary research approach. Such an approach is needed because age-friendly domains (the physical environment, housing, the social environment, opportunities for participation, informal and formal community supports and health services, transportation, communication, and information) cannot be treated in isolation from intrapersonal factors, such as age, gender, income, and functional status, and other levels of influence, including the policy environment.
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              The health, social care and housing needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older people: a review of the literature.

              This paper reports the findings of a literature review of the health, social care and housing needs of older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) adults undertaken in 2006 for the Welsh Assembly Government. Peer-reviewed literature was identified through database searches of BNI, PubMed, CINAHL, DARE, ASSIA and PsychInfo. Follow-up searches were conducted using references to key papers and journals as well as specific authors who had published key papers. A total of 187 papers or chapters were retrieved, of which 66 were included in the study; major themes were identified and the findings synthesised using a meta-narrative approach. The main themes that emerged from the review were isolation, health behaviours, mental health and sexual health behaviours. The literature indicates that the health, social care and housing needs of LGBT older people is influenced by a number of forms of discrimination which may impact upon the provision of, access to and take up of health, social care and housing services. Understanding of the health, social care and housing needs of older LGBT people is limited and research in this area is scarce. The research which exists has been criticised for using small samples and for tending to exclude participants from less affluent backgrounds. The focus of research tends to be on gay men and lesbians; consequently, the needs of bisexual and transgender people remain largely unknown. Additionally, research which does exist tends to focus on a narrow range of health issues, often related to the health needs of younger LGBT people. Discrimination in various forms has a major impact on needs and experiences, leading to marginalisation of LGBT people both in the provision of health and social care services and neglect of these groups in public health research.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                The Gerontologist
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0016-9013
                1758-5341
                February 01 2022
                January 14 2022
                August 06 2021
                February 01 2022
                January 14 2022
                August 06 2021
                : 62
                : 1
                : 66-74
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Gerontology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
                Article
                10.1093/geront/gnab115
                bb262dae-d760-4a9e-8bc5-bca00ebec5a0
                © 2021

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model


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