Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Health-promoting behaviors and social support of women of reproductive age, and strategies for advancing their health: Protocol for a mixed methods study

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      BackgroundDetermining the health-promoting behaviors of women during the important period of reproduction provides valuable information for designing appropriate intervention programs for advancing women's health. There is no study on the health-promoting behaviors of women of reproductive age in Iran. Thus, the aim of this study is to explore these health-promoting behaviors for the purpose of developing comprehensive and culturally sensitive health advancement strategies for Iranian women.Methods/DesignThis study has a sequential explanatory mixed methods design. The follow-up explanation model is used to elaborate the quantitative results by collecting qualitative data from participants who could best assist in elucidating the results. The study is conducted in two sequential phases. The first phase is a population-based cross-sectional survey in which 1350 Iranian women of reproductive age are selected by proportional random multistage cluster sampling of the 22 main municipal sectors of Tehran, Iran. Questionnaires are completed through a face-to-face interview. The second phase is a qualitative study in which participants are selected using purposive sampling in the form of extreme case sampling on the basis of health-promoting behavior scores. The qualitative phase is based on data collected from focus group discussions or individual in-depth interviews. A conventional qualitative content analysis approach is used, and the data are managed with a computer-assisted program. Women's health-promoting strategies are developed using the qualitative and quantitative results, a review of the related literature, and the nominal group technique among experts.DiscussionThe findings of this mixed methods sequential explanatory study, obtained using a culturally sensitive approach, provide insights into the health behavioral factors that need to be considered if preventive strategies and intervention programs are to be designed to promote women's health in the community.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 8

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Three approaches to qualitative content analysis.

      Content analysis is a widely used qualitative research technique. Rather than being a single method, current applications of content analysis show three distinct approaches: conventional, directed, or summative. All three approaches are used to interpret meaning from the content of text data and, hence, adhere to the naturalistic paradigm. The major differences among the approaches are coding schemes, origins of codes, and threats to trustworthiness. In conventional content analysis, coding categories are derived directly from the text data. With a directed approach, analysis starts with a theory or relevant research findings as guidance for initial codes. A summative content analysis involves counting and comparisons, usually of keywords or content, followed by the interpretation of the underlying context. The authors delineate analytic procedures specific to each approach and techniques addressing trustworthiness with hypothetical examples drawn from the area of end-of-life care.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: found
        Is Open Access

        The burden of non communicable diseases in developing countries

        Background By the dawn of the third millennium, non communicable diseases are sweeping the entire globe, with an increasing trend in developing countries where, the transition imposes more constraints to deal with the double burden of infective and non-infective diseases in a poor environment characterised by ill-health systems. By 2020, it is predicted that these diseases will be causing seven out of every 10 deaths in developing countries. Many of the non communicable diseases can be prevented by tackling associated risk factors. Methods Data from national registries and international organisms are collected, compared and analyzed. The focus is made on the growing burden of non communicable diseases in developing countries. Results Among non communicable diseases, special attention is devoted to cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic pulmonary diseases. Their burden is affecting countries worldwide but with a growing trend in developing countries. Preventive strategies must take into account the growing trend of risk factors correlated to these diseases. Conclusion Non communicable diseases are more and more prevalent in developing countries where they double the burden of infective diseases. If the present trend is maintained, the health systems in low-and middle-income countries will be unable to support the burden of disease. Prominent causes for heart disease, diabetes, cancer and pulmonary diseases can be prevented but urgent (preventive) actions are needed and efficient strategies should deal seriously with risk factors like smoking, alcohol, physical inactivity and western diet.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile: development and psychometric characteristics.

          This article describes the development and initial psychometric evaluation of an instrument to measure health-promoting life-style. Based on responses from 952 adults in midwestern communities, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile was evaluated using item analysis, factor analysis, and reliability measures. Factor analysis isolated six dimensions: Self-Actualization, Health Responsibility, Exercise, Nutrition, Interpersonal Support, and Stress Management. These six factors accounted for 47.1% of the variance in the 48-item measure. Second-order factor analysis yielded a single factor, interpreted as Health-Promoting Lifestyle. The alpha reliability coefficient for the total scale is .922; alpha coefficients for the subscales range from .702 to .904. Further evaluation of the measure with different populations appears warranted. This instrument will enable researchers to investigate patterns and determinants of health-promoting life-style, as well as the effects of interventions to alter life-style.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Reproductive Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
            [2 ]Center for Community-Based Participatory Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
            [3 ]Department of Nursing, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran
            [4 ]Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
            [5 ]Midwifery Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
            [6 ]School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
            Contributors
            Journal
            BMC Public Health
            BMC Public Health
            BioMed Central
            1471-2458
            2011
            28 March 2011
            : 11
            : 191
            3073903
            1471-2458-11-191
            21443803
            10.1186/1471-2458-11-191
            Copyright ©2011 Baheiraei et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Categories
            Study Protocol

            Public health

            Comments

            Comment on this article