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Current and field stimulated motion of domain wall in narrow permalloy stripe

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      Abstract

      Of the new types of cryoelectronic devices under development, including phase shifters, giant magnetoresistance switches, diodes, transistors, and memory cells, some are based on hybrid superconductor-normal metal or superconductor-ferromagnet films. Control of these devices is realized by means of pulses of voltage, light, or magnetic field. Spin-polarized current may be used to switch low-temperature devices, as in spin-electronic devices. In the superconducting layer, the current is dissipation less, which would bring large reduction of energy consumption. We demonstrate that mag-netic domain walls in bilayer niobium-permalloy stripes are shifted by electrical current along the stripe even at low tem-perature, with the niobium in the superconducting state. The wall motion in response to current pulses is quite different from that induced by a magnetic field pulses only. The effect could be used to create a new type of sequentially switched serial devices because of very high value of the wall velocity, which excides by many orders of magnitude the velocity of the wall moved with magnetic field pulses.

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      Most cited references 8

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      Oscillatory dependence of current-driven magnetic domain wall motion on current pulse length.

      Magnetic domain walls, in which the magnetization direction varies continuously from one direction to another, have long been objects of considerable interest. New concepts for devices based on such domain walls are made possible by the direct manipulation of the walls using spin-polarized electrical current through the phenomenon of spin momentum transfer. Most experiments to date have considered the current-driven motion of domain walls under quasi-static conditions, whereas for technological applications, the walls must be moved on much shorter timescales. Here we show that the motion of domain walls under nanosecond-long current pulses is surprisingly sensitive to the pulse length. In particular, we find that the probability of dislodging a domain wall, confined to a pinning site in a permalloy nanowire, oscillates with the length of the current pulse, with a period of just a few nanoseconds. Using an analytical model and micromagnetic simulations, we show that this behaviour is connected to a current-induced oscillatory motion of the domain wall. The period is determined by the wall's mass and the slope of the confining potential. When the current is turned off during phases of the domain wall motion when it has enough momentum, the domain wall is driven out of the confining potential in the opposite direction to the flow of spin angular momentum. This dynamic amplification effect could be exploited in magnetic nanodevices based on domain wall motion.
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        Exchange interaction between ferromagnetic domain wall and electric current in very thin metallic films

         L. Berger (1984)
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          Microscopic approach to current-driven domain wall dynamics

          This review describes in detail the essential techniques used in microscopic theories on spintronics. We have investigated the domain wall dynamics induced by electric current based on the \(s\)-\(d\) exchange model. The domain wall is treated as rigid and planar and is described by two collective coordinates: the position and angle of wall magnetization. The effect of conduction electrons on the domain wall dynamics is calculated in the case of slowly varying spin structure (close to the adiabatic limit) by use of a gauge transformation. The spin-transfer torque and force on the wall are expressed by Feynman diagrams and calculated systematically using non-equilibrium Green's functions, treating electrons fully quantum mechanically. The wall dynamics is discussed based on two coupled equations of motion derived for two collective coordinates. The force is related to electron transport properties, resistivity, and the Hall effect. Effect of conduction electron spin relaxation on the torque and wall dynamics is also studied.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            2015-12-04
            1512.01372

            http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

            Custom metadata
            5 pages, 6 figures
            cond-mat.mes-hall

            Nanophysics

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