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      Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge

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          Abstract

          Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers–Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3).

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          Most cited references 49

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          Fear-avoidance model of chronic musculoskeletal pain: 12 years on.

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            Ehlers-Danlos syndromes: revised nosology, Villefranche, 1997. Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation (USA) and Ehlers-Danlos Support Group (UK).

            Categorization of the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes began in the late 1960s and was formalized in the Berlin nosology. Over time, it became apparent that the diagnostic criteria established and published in 1988 did not discriminate adequately between the different types of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes or between Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and other phenotypically related conditions. In addition, elucidation of the molecular basis of several Ehlers-Danlos syndromes has added a new dimension to the characterization of this group of disorders. We propose a revision of the classification of the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes based primarily on the cause of each type. Major and minor diagnostic criteria have been defined for each type and complemented whenever possible with laboratory findings. This simplified classification will facilitate an accurate diagnosis of the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and contribute to the delineation of phenotypically related disorders.
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              The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a disorder with many faces.

              The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDSs) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by fragility of the soft connective tissues and widespread manifestations in skin, ligaments, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. The clinical spectrum varies from mild skin and joint hyperlaxity to severe physical disability and life-threatening vascular complications. The current Villefranche classification recognizes six subtypes, most of which are linked to mutations in genes encoding fibrillar collagens or enzymes involved in post-translational modification of these proteins. Mutations in type V and type III collagen cause classic or vascular EDS respectively, while mutations involving the processing of type I collagen are involved in the kyphoscoliosis, arthrochalasis and dermatosparaxis type of EDS. Establishing the correct EDS subtype has important implications for genetic counseling and management and is supported by specific biochemical and molecular investigations. Over the last years, several new EDS variants have been characterized which call for a refinement of the Villefranche classification. Moreover, the study of these diseases has brought new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of EDS by implicating genetic defects in the biosynthesis of other extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, such as proteoglycans and tenascin-X, or genetic defects in molecules involved in intracellular trafficking, secretion and assembly of ECM proteins. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2015
                20 August 2015
                : 8
                : 591-601
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Physiotherapy, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
                [2 ]Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
                [3 ]Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
                [4 ]Adelante, Center of expertise in Rehabilitation and Audiology, Hoensbroek, the Netherlands
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Mark C Scheper, School of Physiotherapy, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Tafelbergweg 51, 1105BD Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Email m.c.scheper@ 123456hva.nl
                Article
                jpr-8-591
                10.2147/JPR.S64251
                4548768
                © 2015 Scheper et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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