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      Coordination Game in Bidirectional Flow

      Collective Dynamics

      Forschungszentrum Julich, Zentralbibliothek

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          Abstract

          We have introduced evolutionary game dynamics to a one-dimensional cellular- automaton to investigate evolution and maintenance of cooperative avoiding behavior of self-driven particles in bidirectional flow. In our model, there are two kinds of particles, which are right-going particles and left-going particles. They often face opponent particles, so that they swerve to the right or left stochastically in order to avoid conflicts. The particles reinforce their preferences of the swerving direction after their successful avoidance. The preference is also weakened by memory-loss effect. Result of our simulation indicates that cooperative avoiding behavior is achieved, i.e., swerving directions of the particles are unified, when the density of particles is close to 1/2 and the memory-loss rate is small. Furthermore, when the right-going particles occupy the majority of the system, we observe that their flow increases when the number of left-going particles, which prevent the smooth movement of right-going particles, becomes large. It is also investigated that the critical memory-loss rate of the cooperative avoiding behavior strongly depends on the size of the system. Small system can prolong the cooperative avoiding behavior in wider range of memory-loss rate than large system.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Social Force Model for Pedestrian Dynamics

          It is suggested that the motion of pedestrians can be described as if they would be subject to `social forces'. These `forces' are not directly exerted by the pedestrians' personal environment, but they are a measure for the internal motivations of the individuals to perform certain actions (movements). The corresponding force concept is discussed in more detail and can be also applied to the description of other behaviors. In the presented model of pedestrian behavior several force terms are essential: First, a term describing the acceleration towards the desired velocity of motion. Second, terms reflecting that a pedestrian keeps a certain distance to other pedestrians and borders. Third, a term modeling attractive effects. The resulting equations of motion are nonlinearly coupled Langevin equations. Computer simulations of crowds of interacting pedestrians show that the social force model is capable of describing the self-organization of several observed collective effects of pedestrian behavior very realistically.
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            Traffic and Related Self-Driven Many-Particle Systems

             Dirk Helbing (2000)
            Since the subject of traffic dynamics has captured the interest of physicists, many astonishing effects have been revealed and explained. Some of the questions now understood are the following: Why are vehicles sometimes stopped by so-called ``phantom traffic jams'', although they all like to drive fast? What are the mechanisms behind stop-and-go traffic? Why are there several different kinds of congestion, and how are they related? Why do most traffic jams occur considerably before the road capacity is reached? Can a temporary reduction of the traffic volume cause a lasting traffic jam? Under which conditions can speed limits speed up traffic? Why do pedestrians moving in opposite directions normally organize in lanes, while similar systems are ``freezing by heating''? Why do self-organizing systems tend to reach an optimal state? Why do panicking pedestrians produce dangerous deadlocks? All these questions have been answered by applying and extending methods from statistical physics and non-linear dynamics to self-driven many-particle systems. This review article on traffic introduces (i) empirically data, facts, and observations, (ii) the main approaches to pedestrian, highway, and city traffic, (iii) microscopic (particle-based), mesoscopic (gas-kinetic), and macroscopic (fluid-dynamic) models. Attention is also paid to the formulation of a micro-macro link, to aspects of universality, and to other unifying concepts like a general modelling framework for self-driven many-particle systems, including spin systems. Subjects such as the optimization of traffic flows and relations to biological or socio-economic systems such as bacterial colonies, flocks of birds, panics, and stock market dynamics are discussed as well.
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              Cellular automata microsimulation for modeling bi-directional pedestrian walkways

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Collective Dynamics
                Coll Dyn
                Forschungszentrum Julich, Zentralbibliothek
                2366-8539
                March 15 2016
                December 04 2016
                : 1
                :
                Article
                10.17815/CD.2016.8
                1704.02438
                © 2016

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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