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      SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY EXPLAINS THE SCALE DEPENDENCE OF THE NATIVE–EXOTIC DIVERSITY RELATIONSHIP

      , , , , ,
      Ecology
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references23

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          Elton Revisited: A Review of Evidence Linking Diversity and Invasibility

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            Species diversity and biological invasions: relating local process to community pattern.

            J M Levine (2000)
            In a California riparian system, the most diverse natural assemblages are the most invaded by exotic plants. A direct in situ manipulation of local diversity and a seed addition experiment showed that these patterns emerge despite the intrinsic negative effects of diversity on invasions. The results suggest that species loss at small scales may reduce invasion resistance. At community-wide scales, the overwhelming effects of ecological factors spatially covarying with diversity, such as propagule supply, make the most diverse communities most likely to be invaded.
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              EXOTIC PLANT SPECIES INVADE HOT SPOTS OF NATIVE PLANT DIVERSITY

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ecology
                Ecology
                Wiley-Blackwell
                0012-9658
                June 2005
                June 2005
                : 86
                : 6
                : 1602-1610
                Article
                10.1890/04-1196
                bc54cee0-0b5d-42c9-9cbf-2f7bbf2e63f5
                © 2005

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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