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      Facial composites and the misinformation effect: How composites distort memory

      1 , 2 , 3

      Legal and Criminological Psychology

      Wiley

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          Most cited references 38

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          Reconstruction of automobile destruction: An example of the interaction between language and memory

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            Eyewitness identification procedures: Recommendations for lineups and photospreads.

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              Misleading postevent information and memory for events: arguments and evidence against memory impairment hypotheses.

              The claim that a person's memory for an event may be altered by information encountered after the event has been influential in shaping current conceptions of memory. The basis for the claim is a series of studies showing that subjects who are given false or misleading information about a previously witnessed event perform more poorly on tests of memory for the event than subjects who are not misled. In this article we argue that the available evidence does not imply that misleading postevent information impairs memory for the original event, because the procedure used in previous studies is inappropriate for assessing effects of misleading information on memory. We then introduce a more appropriate procedure and report six experiments using this procedure. We conclude from the results that misleading postevent information has no effect on memory for the original event. We then review several recent studies that seem to contradict this conclusion, showing that the studies do not pose problems for our position. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions for broader issues concerning memory.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Legal and Criminological Psychology
                Leg Crim Psychol
                Wiley
                13553259
                September 2016
                September 2016
                May 28 2014
                : 21
                : 2
                : 372-389
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Behavioral Sciences; University of Arkansas-Fort Smith; Arkansas
                [2 ]Department of Psychology; Wofford College; Spartanburg South Carolina
                [3 ]Department of Psychology; University of Texas at El Paso; Texas
                Article
                10.1111/lcrp.12054
                © 2014

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/lcrp.12054

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