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      Calcium oxalate crystal matrix extract: the most potent macromolecular inhibitor of crystal growth and aggregation yet tested in undiluted human urine in vitro.

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      Urological research

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          Abstract

          Demineralization of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals precipitated from human urine in vitro yields an organic crystal matrix extract (CME) consisting predominantly of a single protein which we originally named crystal matrix protein but have subsequently shown to be a urinary form of prothrombin activation peptide fragment 1 (F1). The aim of this study was to determine whether CME is a promoter or inhibitor of CaOx crystallization. The effect of CME on CaOx crystal growth and aggregation was tested using a standard seeded crystallization system, and its effect quantified by use of particle size analysis and a computer model. In addition, the effect of CME on the crystallization of CaOx was tested in undiluted, ultrafiltered human urine using Coulter Counter analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that CME is a potent inhibitor of CaOx crystal growth and aggregation in a seeded metastable solution. However, of greater significance is that at a concentration of 10 mg/l it completely reversed the formation of large crystalline aggregates that form upon the removal of urinary macromolecules from undiluted urine. It was concluded that CME is the most potent macromolecular urinary inhibitor yet to be tested in urine in vitro. By preventing the aggregation of newly formed crystals, the components of CME may significantly reduce the probability of particle retention in vivo and therefore the occurrence of urolithiasis.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Urol. Res.
          Urological research
          0300-5623
          0300-5623
          1995
          : 23
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Surgery, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia.
          Article
          7618236

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