Blog
About

11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Determination of the Membrane Environment of CD59 in Living Cells

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The organization and dynamics of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane, and their role in membrane functionality, have been subject of a long-lasting debate. Specifically, it is unclear to what extent membrane proteins are affected by their immediate lipid environment and vice versa. Studies on model membranes and plasma membrane vesicles indicated preferences of proteins for lipid phases characterized by different acyl chain order; however, whether such phases do indeed exist in live cells is still not known. Here, we refine a previously developed micropatterning approach combined with single molecule tracking to quantify the influence of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) protein CD59 on its molecular environment directly in the live cell plasma membrane. We find that locally enriched and immobilized CD59 presents obstacles to the diffusion of fluorescently labeled lipids with a different phase-partitioning behavior independent of cell cholesterol levels and type of lipid. Our results give no evidence for either specific binding of the lipids to CD59 or the existence of nanoscopic ordered membrane regions associated with CD59.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Diffusion dynamics of glycine receptors revealed by single-quantum dot tracking.

          Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-sized fluorescent probes suitable for advanced biological imaging. We used QDs to track individual glycine receptors (GlyRs) and analyze their lateral dynamics in the neuronal membrane of living cells for periods ranging from milliseconds to minutes. We characterized multiple diffusion domains in relation to the synaptic, perisynaptic, or extrasynaptic GlyR localization. The entry of GlyRs into the synapse by diffusion was observed and further confirmed by electron microscopy imaging of QD-tagged receptors.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Lipid Domain Structure of the Plasma Membrane Revealed by Patching of Membrane Components

            Lateral assemblies of glycolipids and cholesterol, “rafts,” have been implicated to play a role in cellular processes like membrane sorting, signal transduction, and cell adhesion. We studied the structure of raft domains in the plasma membrane of non-polarized cells. Overexpressed plasma membrane markers were evenly distributed in the plasma membrane. We compared the patching behavior of pairs of raft markers (defined by insolubility in Triton X-100) with pairs of raft/non-raft markers. For this purpose we cross-linked glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), Thy-1, influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), and the raft lipid ganglioside GM1 using antibodies and/or cholera toxin. The patches of these raft markers overlapped extensively in BHK cells as well as in Jurkat T–lymphoma cells. Importantly, patches of GPI-anchored PLAP accumulated src-like protein tyrosine kinase fyn, which is thought to be anchored in the cytoplasmic leaflet of raft domains. In contrast patched raft components and patches of transferrin receptor as a non-raft marker were sharply separated. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that coalescence of cross-linked raft elements is mediated by their common lipid environments, whereas separation of raft and non-raft patches is caused by the immiscibility of different lipid phases. This view is supported by the finding that cholesterol depletion abrogated segregation. Our results are consistent with the view that raft domains in the plasma membrane of non-polarized cells are normally small and highly dispersed but that raft size can be modulated by oligomerization of raft components.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The molecular structure of green fluorescent protein.

              The crystal structure of recombinant wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been solved to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing methods. The protein is in the shape of a cylinder, comprising 11 strands of beta-sheet with an alpha-helix inside and short helical segments on the ends of the cylinder. This motif, with beta-structure on the outside and alpha-helix on the inside, represents a new protein fold, which we have named the beta-can. Two protomers pack closely together to form a dimer in the crystal. The fluorophores are protected inside the cylinders, and their structures are consistent with the formation of aromatic systems made up of Tyr66 with reduction of its C alpha-C beta bond coupled with cyclization of the neighboring glycine and serine residues. The environment inside the cylinder explains the effects of many existing mutants of GFP and suggests specific side chains that could be modified to change the spectral properties of GFP. Furthermore, the identification of the dimer contacts may allow mutagenic control of the state of assembly of the protein.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biomolecules
                Biomolecules
                biomolecules
                Biomolecules
                MDPI
                2218-273X
                17 May 2018
                June 2018
                : 8
                : 2
                Affiliations
                Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, Vienna 1040, Austria; fulop@ 123456iap.tuwien.ac.at (G.F.); brameshuber@ 123456iap.tuwien.ac.at (M.B.); arnold@ 123456iap.tuwien.ac.at (A.M.A.); schuetz@ 123456iap.tuwien.ac.at (G.J.S.)
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: sevcsik@ 123456iap.tuwien.ac.at ; Tel.: +43-1-588-0113-4889
                Article
                biomolecules-08-00028
                10.3390/biom8020028
                6023084
                29772810
                © 2018 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article