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      Chromium as an essential nutrient for humans.

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      Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP

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          Abstract

          Chromium is an essential nutrient required for sugar and fat metabolism. Normal dietary intake of Cr for humans is suboptimal. The estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intake for Cr is 50 to 200 microg. However, most diets contain less than 60% of the minimum suggested intake of 50 microg. Insufficient dietary intake of Cr leads to signs and symptoms that are similar to those observed for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Supplemental Cr given to people with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes leads to improved blood glucose, insulin, and lipid variables. Chromium has also been shown to improve lean body mass in humans and swine. Response to Cr is dependent upon form and amount of supplemental Cr. Chromium is a nutrient; therefore, it will only be of benefit to those who are marginally or overtly Cr deficient. Trivalent Cr has a very large safety range and there have been no documented signs of Cr toxicity in any of the nutritional studies at levels up to 1 mg per day.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol.
          Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP
          0273-2300
          0273-2300
          Aug 1997
          : 26
          : 1 Pt 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Beltsville Human Nutrition Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture, ARS, Beltsville, Maryland 20705, USA.
          Article
          S0273-2300(97)91136-3
          10.1006/rtph.1997.1136
          9380836
          bcb72ee6-ed3c-4cdc-ae4d-897c3f3e26e6
          Copyright 1997 Academic Press.
          History

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