4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A vegetation and fire history of Lake Titicaca since the Last Glacial Maximum

      , , , ,

      Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 42

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Late glacial stage and holocene tropical ice core records from huascaran, peru.

          Two ice cores from the col of Huascarán in the north-central Andes of Peru contain a paleoclimatic history extending well into the Wisconsinan (Würm) Glacial Stage and include evidence of the Younger Dryas cool phase. Glacial stage conditions at high elevations in the tropics appear to have been as much as 8 degrees to 12 degrees C cooler than today, the atmosphere contained about 200 times as much dust, and the Amazon Basin forest cover may have been much less extensive. Differences in both the oxygen isotope ratio zeta(18)O (8 per mil) and the deuterium excess (4.5 per mil) from the Late Glacial Stage to the Holocene are comparable with polar ice core records. These data imply that the tropical Atlantic was possibly 5 degrees to 6 degrees C cooler during the Late Glacial Stage, that the climate was warmest from 8400 to 5200 years before present, and that it cooled gradually, culminating with the Little Ice Age (200 to 500 years before present). A strong warming has dominated the last two centuries.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            An 15,000-Year Record of El Niño-Driven Alluviation in Southwestern Ecuador

             D. Rodbell (1999)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The history of South American tropical precipitation for the past 25,000 years.

              Long sediment cores recovered from the deep portions of Lake Titicaca are used to reconstruct the precipitation history of tropical South America for the past 25,000 years. Lake Titicaca was a deep, fresh, and continuously overflowing lake during the last glacial stage, from before 25,000 to 15,000 calibrated years before the present (cal yr B.P.), signifying that during the last glacial maximum (LGM), the Altiplano of Bolivia and Peru and much of the Amazon basin were wetter than today. The LGM in this part of the Andes is dated at 21,000 cal yr B.P., approximately coincident with the global LGM. Maximum aridity and lowest lake level occurred in the early and middle Holocene (8000 to 5500 cal yr B.P.) during a time of low summer insolation. Today, rising levels of Lake Titicaca and wet conditions in Amazonia are correlated with anomalously cold sea-surface temperatures in the northern equatorial Atlantic. Likewise, during the deglacial and Holocene periods, there were several millennial-scale wet phases on the Altiplano and in Amazonia that coincided with anomalously cold periods in the equatorial and high-latitude North Atlantic, such as the Younger Dryas.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
                Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
                Elsevier BV
                00310182
                May 2003
                May 2003
                : 194
                : 1-3
                : 259-279
                Article
                10.1016/S0031-0182(03)00281-5
                © 2003

                Comments

                Comment on this article